Who'd you order a new longboard from?

messierishome

Member
Oct 15, 2020
98
98
San Francisco
Something I am wondering, as I read all these replies/recommendations, is how much of a real difference there is between all these shapers and boards? Is it all just placebo and what a particular buyer thinks he/she is getting? I don't mean in any way to belittle the craftsmanship of these shapers, I've been looking at the sites of all the shapers recommended and their boards are gorgeous and their passion for their craft is apparent, no doubting that, so yes there is a difference between cheap boards imported and someone who has the skill and hand shapes (or has a team that handshapes) boards ... as far as quality goes. But, at what point is there really no discernable difference in how a board helps "you" and what the real difference maker is, which is your own ability?

Is Michael Jordan still the best basketball player if he was wearing Walmart sneakers instead of Nikes? Does Kelly Slater still outperform 99.9% of all surfers if he's on a Wavestorm? Just like a placebo in clinical studies, do you just think a board performs better because you ordered it custom and waited 6 months? And if it is truly better, what is the actual gain ... catching a wave half a foot earlier? Turning slightly faster? Isn't it really your skill, fitness, and ability that makes the most difference.

I've seen surfers locally rip on beat-up and duct-taped Bics, Wavestorms, and other "lesser-quality" boards because they have the skill, while others flop about, hardly catching anything on custom-made Ricky Carrols, Jim Phillips, etc. ... and some of these folks I've talked to in that latter group have been surfing for years, if not decades and they're just bad surfers, or really out of shape, but swear by what these boards can do for them, which from what I can see ... ain't much. It's like we're into different realities.

Another example is me. I am only into this sport about a year. I am newb/kook, but I am an exceptionally strong swimmer, so I can paddle with some pretty decent speed and catch waves earlier and faster than most. Once I get up, it's a different story. Some days I go out and mentally I just feel like I am going to have a kick-butt session ... and I do, relatively speaking ... other days I am just dragging, and using the same board, with even similar conditions, that's what happens. Even within a session, I see big variability ... some waves I am relaxed, my mind is clear, I am ready for and have a great ride, while other waves, which may be very similar, I am just not in the zone for, and have a crap ride.

I like the boards I am seeing from all these recommendations, I honestly do, and I've reached out to some because I am genuinely interested, but I don't think they make that much of a difference. I think in general, there are clearly different style boards for different conditions and how you want to surf (though these groupings are probably rather small ... Longboards, Funboards, Shortboards), but the real difference-maker is your own ability. Maybe it's 80/20, 80% ability 20% board ... but maybe it's even skewed more ... 90/10 or even 95/5 as I think about those surfers who tear it up on Wavestorms and duct-taped Bics ...

Is it worth waiting 6 months+ for a board? If it's to support the "local" shaper and because you like the look/feel of their board(s), have the disposable income, want something that's personal and arguably a work of art, and have the time to wait, then probably yes, it's a hobby, hobbies can be expensive, they're cultivated over time, they bring about enjoyment and happiness when viewed in that lens. Going back to Jordan, Slater and others at the top ... when you're competing at that level, where you're dealing in such tight margins with other highly skilled competitors, the equipment can indeed help ... but for the vast majority of us, I don't think it matters all that much and we just need to become better surfers.

Just some random thoughts...
Sounds like you are in the very early stages of your surf journey. Only advice I would give is make it a personal journey, think less of what others are doing and focus more on yourself. By that I mean grow your surfing where you want and focus less on feeling salty about dudes riding "expensive" boards.

Sounds like you come from a competitive background since most of the examples you bring up focus on outside perception of performance. That is certainly one approach, however you also need to factor in the enjoyment aspect and chasing a feeling.
 

MASErides

Active Member
Nov 18, 2020
144
193
Long Beach, CA
Something I am wondering, as I read all these replies/recommendations, is how much of a real difference there is between all these shapers and boards? Is it all just placebo and what a particular buyer thinks he/she is getting? I don't mean in any way to belittle the craftsmanship of these shapers, I've been looking at the sites of all the shapers recommended and their boards are gorgeous and their passion for their craft is apparent, no doubting that, so yes there is a difference between cheap boards imported and someone who has the skill and hand shapes (or has a team that handshapes) boards ... as far as quality goes. But, at what point is there really no discernable difference in how a board helps "you" and what the real difference maker is, which is your own ability?

Is Michael Jordan still the best basketball player if he was wearing Walmart sneakers instead of Nikes? Does Kelly Slater still outperform 99.9% of all surfers if he's on a Wavestorm? Just like a placebo in clinical studies, do you just think a board performs better because you ordered it custom and waited 6 months? And if it is truly better, what is the actual gain ... catching a wave half a foot earlier? Turning slightly faster? Isn't it really your skill, fitness, and ability that makes the most difference.

I've seen surfers locally rip on beat-up and duct-taped Bics, Wavestorms, and other "lesser-quality" boards because they have the skill, while others flop about, hardly catching anything on custom-made Ricky Carrols, Jim Phillips, etc. ... and some of these folks I've talked to in that latter group have been surfing for years, if not decades and they're just bad surfers, or really out of shape, but swear by what these boards can do for them, which from what I can see ... ain't much. It's like we're into different realities.

Another example is me. I am only into this sport about a year. I am newb/kook, but I am an exceptionally strong swimmer, so I can paddle with some pretty decent speed and catch waves earlier and faster than most. Once I get up, it's a different story. Some days I go out and mentally I just feel like I am going to have a kick-butt session ... and I do, relatively speaking ... other days I am just dragging, and using the same board, with even similar conditions, that's what happens. Even within a session, I see big variability ... some waves I am relaxed, my mind is clear, I am ready for and have a great ride, while other waves, which may be very similar, I am just not in the zone for, and have a crap ride.

I like the boards I am seeing from all these recommendations, I honestly do, and I've reached out to some because I am genuinely interested, but I don't think they make that much of a difference. I think in general, there are clearly different style boards for different conditions and how you want to surf (though these groupings are probably rather small ... Longboards, Funboards, Shortboards), but the real difference-maker is your own ability. Maybe it's 80/20, 80% ability 20% board ... but maybe it's even skewed more ... 90/10 or even 95/5 as I think about those surfers who tear it up on Wavestorms and duct-taped Bics ...

Is it worth waiting 6 months+ for a board? If it's to support the "local" shaper and because you like the look/feel of their board(s), have the disposable income, want something that's personal and arguably a work of art, and have the time to wait, then probably yes, it's a hobby, hobbies can be expensive, they're cultivated over time, they bring about enjoyment and happiness when viewed in that lens. Going back to Jordan, Slater and others at the top ... when you're competing at that level, where you're dealing in such tight margins with other highly skilled competitors, the equipment can indeed help ... but for the vast majority of us, I don't think it matters all that much and we just need to become better surfers.

Just some random thoughts...
1. Yes pro athletes are still the best no matter what gear or products they use. A lot of them grew up in less than stellar conditions and never had amazing equipment as they were developing their bodies and skills. They have world class ability, experience, knowledge, mental toughness and the list goes on. Personal ability/skills > equipment, all day everyday.

2. Surfing is as saturated a market as any so branding is key. Sure a lot of boards are pretty much the same. Their are shapers who stand above because of their experience, designs, and craftsmanship, can also throw in customer relations as some are accessible and happy to talk shop with you. To your ability vs. equipment statement: there are plenty of unskilled people who drive Ferraris and a lot who drive a Prius on our freeways that have 65-75 mph speed limits. Both are gonna get you to your destination, but how do you want to get there, and what can you afford?

3. 6 month to 1 year + waits and board preference is all up to the rider and their preferences. I think understanding the feeling you want when surfing and your style is important to know and that will help you buy equipment that will help you attain your desired experience. I like fast and loose, so I gravitate towards fishes. My 8'6 DR Megafish does indeed feel different in the best way than any board I've ever ridden, so there are differences and MAGIC boards!

4. The person who started this thread wants a 9'6ish longboard! Help him find one:

9'6 Harbour shaped by Stamps:


9'2 Almond:

 
Last edited:

ruley2000s

New Member
Jun 27, 2021
25
12
Narragansett RI
1. Yes pro athletes are still the best no matter what gear or products they use. A lot of them grew up in less than stellar conditions and never had amazing equipment as they were developing their bodies and skills. They have world class ability, experience, knowledge, mental toughness and the list goes on. Personal ability/skills > equipment, all day everyday.

2. Surfing is as saturated a market as any so branding is key. Sure a lot of boards are pretty much the same. Their are shapers who stand above because of their experience, designs, and craftsmanship, can also throw in customer relations as some are accessible and happy to talk shop with you. To your ability vs. equipment statement: there are plenty of unskilled people who drive Ferraris and a lot who drive a Prius on our freeways that have 65-75 mph speed limits. Both are gonna get you to your destination, but how do you want to get there, and what can you afford?

3. 6 month to 1 year + waits and board preference is all up to the rider and their preferences. I think understanding the feeling you want when surfing and your style is important to know and that will help you buy equipment that will help you attain your desired experience. I like fast and loose, so I gravitate towards fishes. My 8'6 DR Megafish does indeed feel different in the best way than any board I've ever ridden, so there are differences!

4. The person who started this thread wants a 9'6ish longboard! Help him find one:

9'6 Harbour shaped by Stamps:


9'2 Almond:

Well said. Thanks for the reply and thoughts. Unfortunately, I don't have any recommendations for used boards or shapers in San Clemente, however I personally surf a Jimmy Lewis HP, and his Noserider. I feel very comfortable on both boards and feel they have accelerated my path on the learning-curve considerably. They are light, but tough as nails. He doesn't shape them, they're made in Vietnam, so maybe it's not what you're looking for. I personally find the 9'8" HP to be really fast, have excellent trim (if I am using that term correctly), and catch just about anything I try to. I've even had other surfers comment on how quick I look on that board ... and I am new to the sport! The Noserider loves to hang back and sit in the wave so that you can walk to the nose, even though I have not done that (yet). I'd say the only downside, because the boards are lighter, is that they get hung up when the offshore is a little strong, though I really don't have a lot of experience to compare them to other heavier boards and how they perform in similar conditions. I know he just got a big shipment and Jimmy is super responsive and accessible. His boards are stored in SF bay area, so it's relatively quick and inexpensive delivery to San Clemente. Anyway, that's my only suggestion and insight based on my limited experience. I am 6'4" 215 ish and like his boards quite a bit.
 

ruley2000s

New Member
Jun 27, 2021
25
12
Narragansett RI
Sounds like you are in the very early stages of your surf journey. Only advice I would give is make it a personal journey, think less of what others are doing and focus more on yourself. By that I mean grow your surfing where you want and focus less on feeling salty about dudes riding "expensive" boards.

Sounds like you come from a competitive background since most of the examples you bring up focus on outside perception of performance. That is certainly one approach, however you also need to factor in the enjoyment aspect and chasing a feeling.
Thank you for the reply. Sincerely appreciate the comment.
 

TurtleTime

Active Member
Dec 25, 2018
117
102
San Clemente
got a new 9.7 from my buddy TLSD. on the 5th surf, lost it....high tide/rocks. 4 dings and multiple blemishes, not to mention smashing the new 10" yater RFC redwood fin...sigh.
 

JBorbone

Well-Known Member
Oct 18, 2017
573
1,122
St Augustine, FL
Something I am wondering, as I read all these replies/recommendations, is how much of a real difference there is between all these shapers and boards? Is it all just placebo and what a particular buyer thinks he/she is getting? I don't mean in any way to belittle the craftsmanship of these shapers, I've been looking at the sites of all the shapers recommended and their boards are gorgeous and their passion for their craft is apparent, no doubting that, so yes there is a difference between cheap boards imported and someone who has the skill and hand shapes (or has a team that handshapes) boards ... as far as quality goes. But, at what point is there really no discernable difference in how a board helps "you" and what the real difference maker is, which is your own ability?

Is Michael Jordan still the best basketball player if he was wearing Walmart sneakers instead of Nikes? Does Kelly Slater still outperform 99.9% of all surfers if he's on a Wavestorm? Just like a placebo in clinical studies, do you just think a board performs better because you ordered it custom and waited 6 months? And if it is truly better, what is the actual gain ... catching a wave half a foot earlier? Turning slightly faster? Isn't it really your skill, fitness, and ability that makes the most difference.

I've seen surfers locally rip on beat-up and duct-taped Bics, Wavestorms, and other "lesser-quality" boards because they have the skill, while others flop about, hardly catching anything on custom-made Ricky Carrols, Jim Phillips, etc. ... and some of these folks I've talked to in that latter group have been surfing for years, if not decades and they're just bad surfers, or really out of shape, but swear by what these boards can do for them, which from what I can see ... ain't much. It's like we're into different realities.

Another example is me. I am only into this sport about a year. I am newb/kook, but I am an exceptionally strong swimmer, so I can paddle with some pretty decent speed and catch waves earlier and faster than most. Once I get up, it's a different story. Some days I go out and mentally I just feel like I am going to have a kick-butt session ... and I do, relatively speaking ... other days I am just dragging, and using the same board, with even similar conditions, that's what happens. Even within a session, I see big variability ... some waves I am relaxed, my mind is clear, I am ready for and have a great ride, while other waves, which may be very similar, I am just not in the zone for, and have a crap ride.

I like the boards I am seeing from all these recommendations, I honestly do, and I've reached out to some because I am genuinely interested, but I don't think they make that much of a difference. I think in general, there are clearly different style boards for different conditions and how you want to surf (though these groupings are probably rather small ... Longboards, Funboards, Shortboards), but the real difference-maker is your own ability. Maybe it's 80/20, 80% ability 20% board ... but maybe it's even skewed more ... 90/10 or even 95/5 as I think about those surfers who tear it up on Wavestorms and duct-taped Bics ...

Is it worth waiting 6 months+ for a board? If it's to support the "local" shaper and because you like the look/feel of their board(s), have the disposable income, want something that's personal and arguably a work of art, and have the time to wait, then probably yes, it's a hobby, hobbies can be expensive, they're cultivated over time, they bring about enjoyment and happiness when viewed in that lens. Going back to Jordan, Slater and others at the top ... when you're competing at that level, where you're dealing in such tight margins with other highly skilled competitors, the equipment can indeed help ... but for the vast majority of us, I don't think it matters all that much and we just need to become better surfers.

Just some random thoughts...

this is a really cool question, and anyone who hates on you for asking it is just being a bully.

is it the archer or the arrow? i reference that question all the time. underscoring your nod to professional sports, the "arrows" in the top tier of professional surfing are far less significant than the archers themselves, specifically as it relates to world-tour shortboarding. JJF, Slater, Toledo, the likes will all compete in the top 20 irregardless of what shortboard they have under their feet as long as it falls within the general size requirements they have to surf at their level.

generally speaking, the boards bought and sold on Jamboards can't and wouldn't be used to compete on the shortboarding world-tour, and moreover only very very few would "perform" well enough to be used on the longboard world-tour either.

this isn't because Jammers are thick-headed or resistant to progress, and for the most part i think the majority of us can agree that you could probably "rip" a Modern or Firewire log a lot harder than you could rip a Frye Eagle, Gato Heroi Dagger, Andreini McVee, or Cooperfish Flex Pig.... BUT the difference is that the boards that you're surfing "well" haven't fundamentally changed anything in the historical timeline of surfing. They aren't adding value to the culture or the art of surfing. although you entered surfing in 2020, it's worth recognizing that surfing was a social activity, a culture, and an art form nearly 20 years before it became a sport even in it's most primitive state of being a "sport".

think about it this way.. a Nissan 370Z, Subaru BRZ, and Volkswagen GTI will all "perform" better for the average driver than an old Alfa Romeo Spider, but there are intangible reasons why online forums are dedicated to the cult-like following of Alfisti who track-drive Alfa Romeos.

if you started surfing as an activity and you enjoy doing it as an activity, then in all honestly your BEST bet is to get a BRAND NEW board from Rhode Island Surf Co or one of your other local shops for less money than a USED "fancy board". they are a great surf shop and have plenty of great cheap boards on their racks. Additionally, Kevin Tanner (Sounding Surf Co) or Matt Garbutt make exceptional surfboards that perform very well with minimal wait times and very reasonable prices. Kevin is a very great dude, +1 for him.

if you took up surfing, like many of us, after being seduced by watching "Crystal Voyager", or having a long childhood of surfing in empty concrete swimming pools, or something similar, then i think the answer to your question would be more clear or perhaps it wouldn't have even been a question at all.. and it would make more sense why there are some of us (builders), both local and not-local, who are chasing something very very different.

based on the direction of this thread though and the questions you've asked, I 100% recommend getting a "Pulpit" from Kevin. they're awesome longboards that just work really well for everyone regardless of your skill level or what you're going for, and it's a board you'll be able to grow into. I believe they probably even have some in stock at RI Surf Co so you won't have to wait at all!
 




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