Whoa!

surf1ng

Active Member
Jan 22, 2022
126
98
Adelaide SA
How could a ‘surfer’ not be able to look at a map and figure out what wind direction is offshore? BTW I find that optimal offshores for most of our local breaks is 300-330 deg. In this age of bots and trolling it’s why I push back and get cranky when some appear way too naive (generous word choice).

Agree about the coastal erosion from this storm. Not a 6-12 hour hurricane event. This one has continued NE destructive gale force winds for 5-7 days. 24/7
Hang on, no need to be cranky, it was a genuine question out of interest from the other side of the world when trying to interpret the stats…
I’m in Australia and totally upside down to Jersey and wondering the kind of wind directions that would be offshore with those swell numbers. Not paddling out, just interested.
 
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SeniorGrom

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2012
3,655
2,961
USA New Jersey
Hang on, no need to be cranky, it was a genuine question out of interest from the other side of the world when trying to interpret the stats…
I’m in Australia and totally upside down to Jersey and wondering the kind of wind directions that would be offshore with those swell numbers. Not paddling out, just interested.
One of the factors that greatly affect our surf energy & quality on most of the East Coast of the US is the continental shelf. This is a wide band of relatively shallow water that extends well off the coast. Knocks down a lot of the infrequent long period Atlantic swells. It’s why in some locations tuna fishermen have to travel as much as 80 miles out to reach deep water. So in a way your question is a good one because proper offshore wind direction is the one factor that allows our beach breaks to line up.
 

Dawnpatrol

Well-Known Member
May 7, 2006
1,632
822
PNW
I live 12 blocks from such an inlet. It's a popular beach in the summer.
Last year the Borough rented the equipment and did back passing.
I think they will contract out. Actually could have 60,000 cubic yards added if they start now. That will get them through Fall.
Peak,

What’s pack passing, is that simply taking a Cat and bladeing sand from the upslope of the beach down to the low tide line.

Adding sand to a beach….do you have to do “sand nourishment” each year? Is the sand pumped from hopper dredge offshore onto the beach?

Who picks up the tab? The Corp or the Borough?
 

surf1ng

Active Member
Jan 22, 2022
126
98
Adelaide SA
One of the factors that greatly affect our surf energy & quality on most of the East Coast of the US is the continental shelf. This is a wide band of relatively shallow water that extends well off the coast. Knocks down a lot of the infrequent long period Atlantic swells. It’s why in some locations tuna fishermen have to travel as much as 80 miles out to reach deep water. So in a way your question is a good one because proper offshore wind direction is the one factor that allows our beach breaks to line up.
Very interesting. Thanks :).
 

PeakMaster

Well-Known Member
Feb 15, 2004
2,255
1,057
USA New Jersey CMC
One of the factors that greatly affect our surf energy & quality on most of the East Coast of the US is the continental shelf. This is a wide band of relatively shallow water that extends well off the coast. Knocks down a lot of the infrequent long period Atlantic swells. It’s why in some locations tuna fishermen have to travel as much as 80 miles out to reach deep water. So in a way your question is a good one because proper offshore wind direction is the one factor that allows our beach breaks to line up.
It's also why Hatteras, in general, has the best waves on the East Coast. It's the location with the shortest "width" of the Continental shelf. SG...excellent point.
 

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Artz

Well-Known Member
Nov 22, 2018
1,410
1,260
Florida
Peak,

What’s pack passing, is that simply taking a Cat and bladeing sand from the upslope of the beach down to the low tide line.

Adding sand to a beach….do you have to do “sand nourishment” each year? Is the sand pumped from hopper dredge offshore onto the beach?

Who picks up the tab? The Corp or the Borough?
most of the “sand nourishment” is paid for by the Federal Government and State local Governments. There is an Annual Federal budget of 500 million +. The Feds pay between 65% to 50% of the cost for sand nourishment the rest is paid for by State and Local Goverments. Then there is also disaster relief funds. in some cases like Hurricane Sandy. The cost was calculated in the Billions of Dollars.
There is a move to switch the funding to have the Local and State Goverment fo pay for more of the cost.
 

PeakMaster

Well-Known Member
Feb 15, 2004
2,255
1,057
USA New Jersey CMC
Back passing is the process by which they use bulldozers and huge dump trucks to take dand from much wider/larger beaches which usually collect the sand from the depleted beaches. It's the most inexpensive method but also not the method for replenishment of more seriously eroded beaches. For those they dredge offshore or from a nearby inlet and pump sand to the needed beaches.
 

Bravoaloha

Active Member
Nov 9, 2019
246
237
Jersey
My home beach just north of Lavalette was 75 yards wide when I was a kid. It's now about 7.5 yards wide. The government installed a dune system which is growing in nicely but there is still no beach and we get sand pumped from other areas or further out, as @PeakMaster mentioned every year or two.

I'm no engineer but why don't they install jetties instead? I know way easier said than done but seems like a more permanent solution than the millions of dollars that get washed out to sea every year.
 

xaaronx

Member
Jun 12, 2021
64
42
Wilmington, NC
My home beach just north of Lavalette was 75 yards wide when I was a kid. It's now about 7.5 yards wide. The government installed a dune system which is growing in nicely but there is still no beach and we get sand pumped from other areas or further out, as @PeakMaster mentioned every year or two.

I'm no engineer but why don't they install jetties instead? I know way easier said than done but seems like a more permanent solution than the millions of dollars that get washed out to sea every year.
Jetties/groins don't stop erosion. Best case is that they displace it somewhere else. Sometimes the rips they create can even pull sand from the beach to offshore bars.
 

PeakMaster

Well-Known Member
Feb 15, 2004
2,255
1,057
USA New Jersey CMC
My home beach just north of Lavalette was 75 yards wide when I was a kid. It's now about 7.5 yards wide. The government installed a dune system which is growing in nicely but there is still no beach and we get sand pumped from other areas or further out, as @PeakMaster mentioned every year or two.

I'm no engineer but why don't they install jetties instead? I know way easier said than done but seems like a more permanent solution than the millions of dollars that get washed out to sea every year.
Great question. Jetties are the crack coke of beach replenishment. You place one...you need to keep placing them continually south in NJ.
 




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