weight works

Ricksurfin

Well-Known Member
Jun 9, 2019
2,974
6,678
San Clemente, CA
Here’s my take as an older ailing surfer.
The comparison I like to make is to that of a flywheel. With it's mass and weight, it’s harder to set in motion, but once in motion harder to slow down and stop. On the other hand, a lighter board accelerates quicker, is easier to redirect, yet doesn’t maintain its motion as well.
Being older and surfing slower more sloping waves, I’ve found I need a board I can spin quicker in the water to start paddling, and then paddle the board up to wave speed as quickly as possible in order to catch it. Also, not being as athletic as I once was, I need a board that redirects easier as I don’t have the power I once had.
Hence the reason I now prefer a lighter board, not to mention that I’m also riding longer boards then I used to, so the weight becomes more of an issue.
 

Sax-son

Well-Known Member
Nov 23, 2019
1,755
2,221
High Sierras, CA
Here’s my take as an older ailing surfer.
The comparison I like to make is to that of a flywheel. With it's mass and weight, it’s harder to set in motion, but once in motion harder to slow down and stop. On the other hand, a lighter board accelerates quicker, is easier to redirect, yet doesn’t maintain its motion as well.
Being older and surfing slower more sloping waves, I’ve found I need a board I can spin quicker in the water to start paddling, and then paddle the board up to wave speed as quickly as possible in order to catch it. Also, not being as athletic as I once was, I need a board that redirects easier as I don’t have the power I once had.
Hence the reason I now prefer a lighter board, not to mention that I’m also riding longer boards then I used to, so the weight becomes more of an issue.
I think that's exactly right. When I was young, I could ride just about anything. A few minutes to get acquainted with the feel of the board and away we went. However, once you start to get up in the upper years, you are just not a limber as you once were and slower to the draw. so, to speak. To me, paddling is everything and if your paddling skills are good and you are on top of it, the rest of it is gravy in my experiences. I once considered myself a great paddler in my time, although I have to admit that my abilities are nowhere near where they once were. So, weight is definitely now a factor for me.
 

XXX

Well-Known Member
Dec 18, 2020
994
1,529
Nowhere
One could argue that with the price of surfboards today, a heavier glassed could add to its longevity. However, Bruce has a good point as to how the bottom is shaped and the performance of such a board.
6 oz bottom, 6/4 top. A patch at the fins and maybe at the knee paddle zone. A little cloth build up at the tip and tail for damage control. 3/8" to 5/8" wood stringer. Medium density blank and yer' good to go. No need for a scale.
 

SeniorGrom

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2012
3,785
3,353
USA New Jersey
Some of those heavy logs at the end of the ‘golden age’ (66-67) were really dialed-in. In addition to much of what has been mentioned, I had an awakening surfing vintage stuff when standing in the right place on the board. Heavy boards can become lively and loose!
 
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Sax-son

Well-Known Member
Nov 23, 2019
1,755
2,221
High Sierras, CA
Some of those heavy logs at the end of the ‘golden age’ (66-67) were really dialed-in.
In the mid 1970's, I started to revisit all those heavy long board models. That was because of summer surf being small and none of current builders were making any. Also, you could pick them up all day long for $10 to $25 then. Of all those boards that I surfed on, my favs were the Weber Performers, Yater Spoons Bing Lightweights, Hansen Superlight, Harbour Cheaters, Weber Feather's, etc. This is probably the timeline you are speaking of.

Prior to that, a lot of the boards were heavy and planky. I am talking from 1964 to mid 1966. That was not my favorite timeline for boards. However, prior to that, there was an earlier period from say 1962 through 1963 where I thought the boards were overall pretty good riding boards. I am talking Hobie's and Bing pig shapes and the Jacobs boards. Obviously, there were some other builders that were involved as well, but I think the Hobie's with the wide balsa stringers were my favs from that period.
 

XXX

Well-Known Member
Dec 18, 2020
994
1,529
Nowhere
Some of those heavy logs at the end of the ‘golden age’ (66-67) were really dialed-in. In addition to much of what has been mentioned, I had an awakening surfing vintage stuff when standing in the right place on the board. Heavy boards can become lively and loose!
In the curl, not so much on the shoulder or over head.
 




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