Wanted: Tyler Riddler

Discussion in 'Surfing' started by harboursurfer, Apr 22, 2008.

  1. aslbuck

    aslbuck Member

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    Jan 29, 2005
    Yea. Do what Nedsurf? Sell it for $450? Or buy it for $450? Its too much if you ask me. Looks like a late 1980s 422 or maybe an early 90s one. Hardly worth hanging on a wall?
     
  2. nedsurf

    nedsurf Well-Known Member

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    Jan 22, 2005
    Well, maybe my ignorance is showing (again) but I thought the 422 was a single fin. Take a look at the side bites and tell me if they are original.
     
  3. surfore

    surfore Active Member

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    Mar 2, 2004
    USA California
    1) There's the original 422 from the 60's that Hap (Dale) created which was a soft railed, single fin.

    2) Hap brought the 422 back in the 90's which evolved into a semi-hard railed in the tail with a single or 2+1 option. Usually Hap's side bites were glass on's back then.

    3) Then Hap came out with a more subtlety humped performance 422 that were a 2+1 and the 211 that was shorter and usually a rounded pin.

    4) Then Matt recreated the original 422 - the soft railed, single fin nose rider resembling the one from the 60's.

    This board appears to be the second one...
     
  4. d123

    d123 Member

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    Apr 13, 2006
    USA California
    Six pages for this thread. What ever happened to the guy who wanted to buy a used Riddler?
     
  5. nedsurf

    nedsurf Well-Known Member

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    Jan 22, 2005
    Surfore - thanks for the information. I did some research also and found the tri option, of which I was neither aware nor have ever seen. Still I think the original question was valid albeit aimed in the wrong direction. With the design originally driven by Dale's desire to create a great noserider I wonder how it evolved into a tri and away from that rather pure goal.

    In any case, I stand corrected. Aslbuck - I agree it ain't worth $450, and evidently no one else does either since there are 0 bids.
     
  6. d123

    d123 Member

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    Apr 13, 2006
    USA California
    When Hap started shapping again, he went the way of making a progressive 422.
     
  7. BoardDesign

    BoardDesign Member

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    Mar 14, 2007
    USA
    nedsurf wrote:
    Uuuuh... The late 80's.. Buttrock, mullets and tri-fin longboards!!! I'm guessin.
     
  8. nedsurf

    nedsurf Well-Known Member

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    Jan 22, 2005
    My ignorance on the 422 led me this story by Dale on the origin of the 422. After reading a couple of times I thought I would share with others. It would have nice to have known Velzy and had a chance to talk with him.

    In 1963, my most important development project was the Banjo Board. By the end of '63, nose riding was becoming increasingly popular, although only the best surfers were able to do it very well. Thus my new goal was to design a board that would make nose riding easier for the more advanced surfer, and possible for the average surfer. The Banjo Board developed earlier in the year wasn't a bad nose rider by any means. But I had stopped production on that board for purely business reasons.

    What would be the "ultimate nose rider?" Well, first of all, I figured I needed a full nose with a little rocker, a flat spot in the middle, and an extreme kick-tail. My first attempt was a board with these general characteristics, looking sort of like a standard board with an unusually wide nose. Results with this board were disappointing. I'd go to the nose on it, start picking up speed, and the tail would spin out. Obvisously, something was wrong: too wide and too parallel, I figured.

    As I began drawing the plan shape for the new board, I realized that I didn't want an extreme kick tail with hips -- this was the main reason the first board had spun out. So I wound up drawing a sort of reverse Banjo: cutting away the bumps to an extreme. This left an extremely narrow tail relative to the width of the center, giving it the overall look of a bat ray. As I continued to work on the board, I became more and more excited. This one was going to work!

    I took the new board to the Newport River Jetty, where I had tested the first board. The first wave, I nearly stepped off the rear of the board, the tail was so narrow. But I recovered my stance, made my turn, and to the nose I went. I looked back at the tail, and saw something quite remarkable - water was flowing over it, holding it down. Since holding the tail down was the main design objective for a nose rider, I knew I had the answer.

    I continued surfing for the rest of the day (probably about four hours), with a constant grin on my face. For the next few days, I loaned it out to anyone curious enough to want to try it. Everyone was amazed.

    Over the next couple of weeks, I got two more radical ideas: a nose concave running 3/4 of the way back, and a deck concave on the tail. The bottom concave was to give more lift, and the deck concave was to hold water and provide a good turning point. I finished the board, and took it to Lowers. As I had hoped, the lift was better, and the nose rides were faster. I rode it for a number of waves myself, and then began loaning it out. "What the heck is this thing? What do you call it?" I was asked. "What to call it, I don't know", I said. "All I know is that I like it".

    The next day I began taking orders for them. In three weeks, I sold about 25. Then my old business partner Hap Jacobs, still in Hermosa, heard about the board and came down to Newport to talk to me about it. He asked if I'd shape the boards, and let him sell them in his shop in Hermosa under his own name. I agreed. "What will we call it, though?" Hap asked. "I don't know...what's your address?" "422 Pacific Coast Highway".

    "Alright, call it the '422'".
     
  9. hangtensurfing

    hangtensurfing New Member

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    Apr 24, 2008
    I saw the 422 began the carved hips outline on the surfboard and influenced todays noseriders.
     

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