Tri plane hull

sonOsea

Well-Known Member
Apr 6, 2010
621
519
USA
To the OP.
Go to Christine's web page, find the contact email.
Ask her (the shaper) the same question you did here.
Wait one or two days for the answer.
She's a good communicator and always willing to answer questions.

Sleep well knowing you got the straight scoop directly from the maker.
 

Bruce Fowler

Well-Known Member
Jul 28, 2018
1,810
3,350
California
Renee, and she made the best damn soup....Steve had many influences, none stronger than Mike Diffenderfer...both Steve's and Pat Taylor's RP single fin pocket rockets apex boards of that design...Pat deck's a trip, during one period full thickness at stringer with flat drop to rail break..V decks
Ah yes, Renee....... Steve used to eat these 'GARLIC sandwiches'. We took one ride down to Carmel beach break or to Marina or somewhere....... oof!

Nowadays I cook & eat a lot of onion & garlic....... probably didn't even need to get vaccinated. lol
 
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aporta

Well-Known Member
Nov 15, 2019
132
281
Brooklyn
My understanding:

Standard Labyrinth - roll entry to single to spiral vee. I think she also does roll-flat-vee on some.

TPH Labyrinth - same bottom as Manny's TPHs, which is roll entry into a flat panel that has a soft bevel/chine meeting the underside of the rail as turns up towards to the deck. This soft chine then fades closer to the rail and eventually meets it towards and into the tail.

Standard Version is probably less 'hully' in feel than the TPH. *disclaimer - I have not ridden either personally.

Easier to explain with a diagram, probably....

Not all TPHs are the same, but the same broad principles in how the 'inside' bottom shape is shaped into the broader rail-to-rail bottom shape kinda hold true. An extreme version of a TPH is the Greenough Edge design.

I think @aporta has some experience with Christine's boards, but forgive me if I am mistaken
I surfed her tri plane cosmic bandito in amazing New England surf this morning. I’m a full laymen in this world of board building, but I will say I have surfed my 9’0 bandito tph and 8’4 labyrinth tph by furrow craft in whatever waves I can get , from ankle to head +. Plenty of planing area to trim on , and full on can smash that bottom turn back into the pocket for speed.

She’s a great communicator and can answer any of your questions in a more technical way than I can. But I can provide a full on two thumbs up for ride-ability and making my mediocre self appear proficient on a fine craft.
 

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Bruce Fowler

Well-Known Member
Jul 28, 2018
1,810
3,350
California
The first group of Tri Plane Hulls I've put thru as "build ahead Production Customs" range in sizes 5'10", 6'4', 6'10" 7'4", 7'6", 7'9"............ did 3 & 5 fin versions. This range covers quite a few different surfers weights for paddling and desired size of personal ride. I used the V Machine outline as a main frame to work from as it has proven itself globally over the past 15 years. I'll post a few quickie pix of boards I snapped going thru glassing that show a bit of the features. Not perfectly centered or focused but will have to suffice til later.

The bottoms are subtle but definitive w/3" chined panels & single center concave into a smooth transition back near the cluster of fins. The Planshape shown here is used while the cross section doesn't depict the hull bottom. The file bottom photo will show contours.
TRI PLANE HULL BOTTOM.jpg
TPH ONGLASSING RACKS.jpg
TPH OFCENTER BOTTOM VIEW.jpg
Tri Plane Hull Profile.jpg
20211129_140145.jpg
TPH W:OTHER TAILS.jpg
TPH W:OTHER MODELS.jpg
BF Design Outline Cross Section.jpg
 
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Larcxthesurfer

Well-Known Member
Sep 2, 2021
221
355
Long Beach, ca
The first group of Tri Plane Hulls I've put thru as "build ahead Production Customs" range in sizes 5'10", 6'4', 6'10" 7'4", 7'6", 7'9"............ did 3 & 5 fin versions. This range covers quite a few different surfers weights for paddling and desired size of personal ride. I used the V Machine outline as a main frame to work from as it has proven itself globally over the past 15 years. I'll post a few quickie pix of boards I snapped going thru glassing that show a bit of the features. Not perfectly centered or focused but will have to suffice til later.

The bottoms are subtle but definitive w/3" chined panels & single center concave into a smooth transition back near the cluster of fins. The Planshape shown here is used while the cross section doesn't depict the hull bottom. The file bottom photo will show contours. View attachment 37147 View attachment 37148 View attachment 37149 View attachment 37150 View attachment 37151 View attachment 37152 View attachment 37153 View attachment 37144
Amazing man. This is like intellectual treasure. Have you noted a noticeable difference in the ride characteristics between the hull entry to triplane vs hull entry to single concave?
 

Bruce Fowler

Well-Known Member
Jul 28, 2018
1,810
3,350
California
The slightly off center photograph of the bottom showing the bottom concave and chine:

Pretty flat at stringer with slight roll as it releases to the nose rails which are soft but tapered like what is commonly found on a speed egg.

A rounder more HULL-ISH nose would require more paddle power or push to get into a wave than my flatter version.

As far as noticeable difference..... the rounder more hullish the nose entry, the more initial resistance there will be
in paddling & catching a wave.

The TPH's I'm doing are more streamlined ounce for ounce compared to a classic v machine. I've made them consistently 1/2" narrower than their sister ship counterparts. They are also about 1/8" thinner at their thickest point and more foiled like a New Machine formula. The reason I'm doing this is because the TPH have more lift
than the 'Classic' or even NVM's..... I didn't have a cross section diagram to illustrate how the boards become thinner along the rail due to the chine/bevel of the Tri plane panel.

TPH's (at least my version) are flyers......... this was a generic term that Channel Islands decided to snatch up to give one of their designs a Model name. It originally stood for a board that was thinner. more foiled, esp. the rails, that you could hug higher up on the wave face where the speed is at. Flyers are good boards for "high lining". The design's rail penetrates the wave face easier. The rail can be released to swoop down to the bottom carving into a banking type, hard, deep railed bottom turn.

Flyers Fly!

The bottom contours give the board 'pump ability' - you can work a lot of speed out of them, esp. the thinner TPH's......... they are good for s-turning thru long sections to make waves...... lined up Rincon, Malibu, Trestles, and other such surf spots.
 
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Larcxthesurfer

Well-Known Member
Sep 2, 2021
221
355
Long Beach, ca
The slightly off center photograph of the bottom showing the bottom concave and chine:

Pretty flat at stringer with slight roll as it releases to the nose rails which are soft but tapered like what is commonly found on a speed egg.

A rounder more bullish nose would require more paddle power or push to get into a wave than the my flatter version.

As far as noticeable difference..... the rounder more bullish the nose entry, the more initial resistance there will be
in paddling & catching a wave.

The TPH's I'm doing are more streamlined ounce for ounce compared to a classic v machine. I've made them consistently 1/2" narrower than their sister ship counterparts. They are also about 1/8" thinner at their thickest point and more foiled like a New Machine formula. The reason I'm doing this is because the TPH have more lift
than the 'Classic' or even NVM's..... I didn't have a cross section diagram to illustrate how the boards become thinner along the rail due to the chine/bevel of the Sri plane panel.

TPH's (at least my version) are flyers......... this was a generic term that Channel Islands decided to snatch up to give one of their designs a Model name. It original stood for a board that was thinner. more foiled, esp. the rails that you could hug higher up on the wave face where the speed is at. The design's rail penetrates the wave face easier. The rail can be released to swoop down to the bottom carving into a banking type, hard, deep railed bottom turn.

The bottom contours give the board 'pump ability' - you can work up a lot of speed out of them, esp. the thinner TPH's......... they are good for s-turning thru long sections to make waves...... lined up Rincon, Malibu, Trestles, and other such surf spots.
Thank you Bruce
 

Larcxthesurfer

Well-Known Member
Sep 2, 2021
221
355
Long Beach, ca
It would be good to have the definitive answer here so we don't have to all bother Christine while her book is closed haha

All stock Labyrinths have a mellow tri plane hull bottom with tucked under edge by the leading edge of the center fin.
Customs have been made with spiral vee concave or with an Edge bottom.
When I first designed the Labyrinth, they had spiral vee but as the design progressed, I prefered the feel, speed and ride of the TPH bottom so started making them all that way.”

Per Christine
 




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