Tragedy at sea

Discussion in 'Surfing' started by nedsurf, Sep 2, 2019.

  1. pintail

    pintail Active Member

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    Feb 19, 2004
    LA, California
    It's all too speculative at this point. We'll have to wait for information provided by the crew and from the NTSB evaluation. A guy I work with has spent time diving from trips on that boat; said it would be very difficult to get out of the lower deck in the event of a fast-spreading fire at night.
     
  2. Bruce Fowler

    Bruce Fowler Well-Known Member

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    Jul 28, 2018
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    If the L.A. Times article link worked for others to read, it gives a good description of the boat's configuration, that it was built in '81 of a wood hull, glass construction (probably very similar to the Radon boats I worked on growing up with Ronny, Donny, Mike and their dad). The article mentions the escape hatch to the rear not having hoops to jump thru to clear that passage way, and that the captain always went thru detailed instructions regarding the location and other safety issues.

    I know a LOT of people that have spent countless hours on that boat along with the other two in the fleet. Think about if you were there, in a dead sleep 3:00 in the morning, and the next thing you know is smoke, maybe pitch black darkness other then flames & intense heat, panicked people all around you. Just horrible.

    Sh-t happens, and people die. Life ain't fair sometimes, thinking of Mark Foo @ Mav's.
     
  3. pintail

    pintail Active Member

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    Feb 19, 2004
    LA, California
    I'm afraid that this isn't one of those shit happens types of occurrences. Something electrical failed, or a fuel or gas line was compromised, or someone did something wrong. There was a fire on a similar boat many years ago that was attributed to metal straps that held electrical wires, and which had eroded through the wire coating due to gradual motion. That sort of thing is predictable, and the wires should have been passed through a grommet or something like that to prevent chafe. I hope we'll get a definitive explanation.
     
    nedsurf likes this.
  4. Bruce Fowler

    Bruce Fowler Well-Known Member

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    Jul 28, 2018
    California
    I stand corrected, and you are right. I guess what I was trying to say is life has its challenges, and as diligent as man can be, things like this can and do still happen..... Foo wasn't a good example, the shuttle crashing because of an O Ring failure might be better or commercial airliners with regular maintenance having something fail..... or, somebody having a bad day and overlooking something. If life was perfect, maybe nothing like this would ever happen. That's just not reality. We live at risk every second of every day of our lives.
     
    Tenfooter and pintail like this.
  5. miscreant

    miscreant Well-Known Member

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    I’d bet there’ll be a push for more regulation.
     
  6. chris a

    chris a Member

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    Feb 17, 2004
    This one hurts. While I’ve never never been on Conception, I’ve been on many San Francisco, Half Moon Bay, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Long Beach, Dana Point, San Diego charter fishing and dive boats. Many of these boats have been operating for decades and are anchors of their coastal communities. It’s what we do. People go back to them yearly with their friends and family for a reason. This horrible tragedy will lead to something to M’s point in some years. Fair winds to the lost souls of Conception.
     
  7. miscreant

    miscreant Well-Known Member

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    You think more regulation will prevent future tragedies?
     
  8. PeakMaster

    PeakMaster Well-Known Member

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    Feb 15, 2004
    USA New Jersey CMC
    Agreed. One has to believe that the Coast Guard regulations combined with State and local licensing requirements, marine law enforcement inspections,...the regulation thing is covered pretty well. It's not new, untested technology involved here.
    Catastrophic events like this one are usually a collection or series of failures including human error...much like in the airliner example used above.
    NTSB is pretty squared away and they investigate the tiniest of details and they don't rush to conclusions. They will ID precisely the cause(s).
     
    Tenfooter likes this.
  9. nedsurf

    nedsurf Well-Known Member

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    Crew interviews indicate that there was no night/fire watch on duty. Could explain a lot.
     
  10. PeakMaster

    PeakMaster Well-Known Member

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    Feb 15, 2004
    USA New Jersey CMC
    It would seem that would be SOP with that many people on board. Is it a requirement or a recommendation?
     

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