Thoughts on Joe Quigg

stopchewingplease

Well-Known Member
May 1, 2021
205
444
SoCal
With all this talk about gliders, I have been thinking a lot about certain boards that I have loved. The board I have thought about most was the one I wrote about in a recent post on the glider thread relating a magical day in the water. And with the death of Pat Curren I have also been thinking about some other historic surf icons of similar time. And the board on my mind was shaped by Tanner Prairie, who, for those not aware, learned to shape from Mike Marshall who learned from Quigg. And I have even heard that Tanner, along with another shaper, have inherited a lot of Quigg's templates. The glassed on fin on the board I rode is even named by Tanner as a 8.5" Quigg Speed Fin. All this to say: I have been thinking about Joe Quigg.

Now, of course his boards worked. And even worked well, we should agree. Known now for the origin of the malibu chip and other general board design that was characterized as being easy to surf. (And for the Simmons voices out there I also love Simmons, but I am focused on Quigg) Hell, even Miki Dora fell in love with a Quigg pintail given to him from Gard Chapin, as we know. If his boards worked so well for them, well of course I would have a similar reaction. Not to say that I am any Dora.

But I remember being so astonished with the Tanner when I first rode it--having been originally quite afraid of its wide tail, large fin, and minimal rocker alongside being not incredibly awestruck at the flat bottom and soft, thick 60/40 rails--that I needed to get more information from Tanner. The question, "Why did it work so well?", would give my mind no rest. Now I had a great phone call with Tanner but I am open to saying that it was not much more information than I already expected: 60/40 rails being fast and a flat bottom planing well, etc. But I was reminded of a real lesson in simplicity.

1674707382365.png


[As I have written before] The 11 ft (I might have missremembered the length once or twice but sources would have it as 11ft) board could catch a rolling beach break ending with a 100yrd ride, but it could also bottom turn like no other. For every soft wave I surfed, I surfed it equally in a dumpy beach break. And somehow the heft of the board swung like butter and I would leave the water thinking I was Phil Edwards after running up towards the nose a couple times or making any section with fast trim. Magic!

1674707359263.png
Not the same board, but the same model. Shows clear outline, however the tail on the board I rode is noticably wider. Assuming the foil logo is the same dimensions on each board, judge tail width from there and adjust the outline.


So here I am looking through articles, videos and photos about half a year later and it hits me that I have seen these boards before. Or at least something very similar. And with these recent threads on my mind I go to Daydream's website to see if they have any photos of this magic board I have had the privilege to ride and sure enough they do. And comparing most of the outlines--but specifically the whitish-grey board with blue graphic on the nose--the similarity is impressive. (The whitish-grey board was reportedly a gun for Buzzy Trent and later owned by Dora; note the outline of the Quigg speed fin) For further comparison, the Tanner has such minimal rocker by our current standards to be flat, as reported by its shaper.

1674707510761.png

1674707460607.png 1674707491259.png

Now the conclusion I am headed towards might be quite predictable at this point, but I must make it clear that I in no way want or advocate for the diminishing of Tanner as a shaper. If he has Quigg's templates, I am all the more happier that he use them, if he even does, as good design is simply timeless. Or as if I had any right to tell him that he could not. Let alone the historic experiential significance I have now been through and his ability to shape, regardless.

But the arrow went thud, a bullseye in my brain, the Tanner I have ridden should be thought of as a Quigg. Or at least as close to riding a Quigg as I might ever get. And I simply find it an incredible testament to Quigg, and Tanner, as a shaper that I have had this experience against the plethora of new designs I have ridden. It is like walking through a city of beautiful, varied architecture only to find that an oak at its center is the most beautiful.

Here's to Joe Quigg. Timeless design makes for a timeless ride.

buzzytrent.PNG


These two captions pose an interesting question. Was the above board shaped for Buzzy Trent and later owned by Miki dora a seperate board from either of the two in these images (impossible to know, probably) or is one of these captions wrong? Interesting, nonetheless.

Edit: under the same photo as below is this caption from SHACC:
Capture.PNG


fisherdora.PNG


And finally, it should be obvious that Quigg had designed a surfboard that rode well simple from this photo, perfect trim:

quiggtrim.png


PHOTO SOURCES:
https://www.surfersjournal.com/editorial/the-archivist-turning-points/
https://daydreamsurfshop.com/collections/used-surfboards/products/110-tanner-baby
https://tannersurfboards.co/longboards
https://www.shacc.org/2019/01/05/joe-quigg-design-alternatives-part-3/
 
Last edited:

shapewright

Well-Known Member
Aug 6, 2006
1,203
2,379
USA California
Mickey Munoz has Joe’s butcher paper template of the Buzzy gun, it had tack holes in it everywhere. Mickey said Joe would tack it on the ceiling above his bunk bed and by hand sketch the curves on the paper..
He’d lay down and look up at the lines before continuing.
On the backside was a fin template of his shorter egg boards.
0DC3EE1C-C251-48A3-8C53-9E4728F0D9B1.jpeg
D828DEEE-A579-4CE6-9530-258E1598E591.jpeg
 

Driftwood

Well-Known Member
Dec 2, 2014
1,704
1,793
France
I've been fascinated by Quigg's shapes for a while now as well.

I picked up an absolute wreck of a Quigg maybe five or six years ago. And while that board was beyond surfing (no, really, believe me on this one - without stripping it, replacing massive amounts of rotted foam and the stringer, and reglassing, in which case it would be a different board altogether - it was amazing. Pretty light, refined foil and 60/40 rails, almost flat up front to a slightly rounded bottom in the tail... Rocker was really low, but for a maybe '60/'61 board, present.

I shaped a balsa copy, though two inches shorter. I tried to keep everything else as close as I could get it.

Hands down the best board of that type I've ever ridden. Fast, surprisingly nimble, just a blast to ride.

Can't wait to get back to the SHACC and take a few measurements and photos for a chip project...
 

stopchewingplease

Well-Known Member
May 1, 2021
205
444
SoCal
I've been fascinated by Quigg's shapes for a while now as well.

I picked up an absolute wreck of a Quigg maybe five or six years ago. And while that board was beyond surfing (no, really, believe me on this one - without stripping it, replacing massive amounts of rotted foam and the stringer, and reglassing, in which case it would be a different board altogether - it was amazing. Pretty light, refined foil and 60/40 rails, almost flat up front to a slightly rounded bottom in the tail... Rocker was really low, but for a maybe '60/'61 board, present.

I shaped a balsa copy, though two inches shorter. I tried to keep everything else as close as I could get it.

Hands down the best board of that type I've ever ridden. Fast, surprisingly nimble, just a blast to ride.

Can't wait to get back to the SHACC and take a few measurements and photos for a chip project...
Have any photos?
 

Veterano

Well-Known Member
Aug 29, 2013
2,834
3,871
On Mom driving surf trips south, we stopped into Joe's shop a couple of times. Even to a gremmie like myself, his boards were different than the South Bay boards I saw and rode at home (Bing, Jacobs, Dewey, etc). Met Joe in his shop once and he was was cool. Legend.
 

Driftwood

Well-Known Member
Dec 2, 2014
1,704
1,793
France
A few of my tribute to this board... they've been posted here before so sorry for the redundancy for some.

Phone photos 2019 148.jpg


I did glass this one in epoxy, like I now always do for balsa. A halfway decent polish for epoxy though!

Phone photos 2019 151.jpg


Love the D-fin with the subtle curvature on the rear. I kept a template of the fin.

Phone photos 2019 138.jpg
 

shapewright

Well-Known Member
Aug 6, 2006
1,203
2,379
USA California
A few of my tribute to this board... they've been posted here before so sorry for the redundancy for some.

View attachment 53994

I did glass this one in epoxy, like I now always do for balsa. A halfway decent polish for epoxy though!

View attachment 53995

Love the D-fin with the subtle curvature on the rear. I kept a template of the fin.

View attachment 53996
71A12708-C7B5-417D-8AAF-91424DBE03D4.jpeg

These are a pair of Malibu Chips I built from one of Joes templates that Andy Lyons and The Mayor of Malibu rode from 3rd point to the pier
 




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