Snowboard Advice

KDenning

Well-Known Member
May 14, 2015
470
653
Ventura, CA
Some of y'all might have caught that my wife and I moved away from Ventura and up to Lake Tahoe this year and we'll be picking up snowboarding.

Zero previous experience. Nada. Can't say I'm thrilled at the idea of learning how to do something new at age 30 but living in the mountains and not getting out there feels like a waste.

I've been surfing for almost two decades but never really took to short boarding - logged 95% of the time and dabbled in the mid length dark arts for a while so I'm not really looking for that "surf" feel that a lot of folks talk about. We've heard 50 - 50 feedback: "you'll pick it up right away, it's just like surfing" and "they're complete opposites, zero translation from one to the other."

Welcoming any and all advice!
 

KDenning

Well-Known Member
May 14, 2015
470
653
Ventura, CA
Do yourself a favor and invest in some lessons and skip the strugglers learning curve.

Have fun that sounds like a dream. Checkout Downeyville not too far from you in the summer for some really epic mountain biking too.
Getting lessons has been the only consistent piece of advice from others so far - we're definitely going to take advantage of getting lessons!

I taught surf lessons during high school and college and really think that makes the difference between the people that stick with surfing and the "I tried it a few times and never really got the hang of it" crowd.

Will definitely be spending some time around Downieville this summer! Looks like rad biking and an even more rad community of folks up there.
 

Old Dude

Member
Oct 12, 2021
26
35
Germany
Well, I started snowboarding at the age of 40, after almost 25 years of skiing. I began surfing at 40 too. I think I’m a much better snowboarder than surfer, due to the ski and snow experience. My surfing is still late beginner or early intermediate level, because I only surf on vacation.
With your surfing experience you will learn snowboarding quite fast, snowboarding in powder is very similar to surfing. But you will start and maybe mainly ride on prepared slopes.
Tipps: start slow, the slope is always a very long shoulder, the is no flat in front of it. Ride across the slope left to right, then right to left (or vice versa), combine with turns. the basic turns, in general the a turn over the base of the board and a second using the edges, the carving turn; Similar to trimming and carving turns during surf. Learn to stop! Don’t ride faster than you can handle. Wear a helmet and gloves with a wrist protector and get a trouser with a waterproof bottom, best with some cushions or protection, because you will sit a lot, especially the first days, your bottom will be your emergency brake!
Last, laugh and have fun, you will be a kook, but everybody is one at first, laugh it off. Same with surfing, the best snowboarder is the one who has the most fun
 

takedown

Well-Known Member
Jun 26, 2017
522
370
Eugene, OR
Definitely lessons, some resorts will have learn to ride lessons where it includes everything for 3 days which is a good amount of time to get the hang of it.

On groomed slopes the key is pressure needs to be on your front leg, when you lean back you'll slide out, leaning forward (down the mountain) keeps you on the right path, it was the hardest thing for me to learn and might be tough for a longboarder since your spend a lot of time in a relaxed stance.

Try to learn riding switch early, it gets harder as you get set in your way and having the ability to ride switch can help out a ton on long runs or in tough situations.

Don't skimp out on your boots. They are the most important part of the package and need to fit really well. I'd go mid range to high end and buy used on the other items before going cheap on boots. Once you get the hang of it experiment with your adjustments. Much like changing a fin, adjusting your bindings can have a big impact.

Have a blast, it's a great time and you are in a perfect location.
 

jory

Well-Known Member
Dec 25, 2005
854
993
United Kingdom
Lessons!

Wear butt protecting shorts and a helmet at least.
Take a few more lessons even after you can link basic turns down a black. Many people don’t and miss out on a lot of control for others safety and the joy of properly railing carves.

Watch this to see how much fun you can have barely leaving the ground!


Riding powder is pretty close to surfing without having to paddle back out.
 
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jonbiz

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2016
391
579
Wilmington NC
Get lessons. Speed is your friend. Once you’re comfortable on some steeper slopes, go and enroll yourself in a backcountry safety program.
Get a pow board and never look back. Honestly big mountain with bowls and waist to chest deep powder is about as good as it gets. Glades are almost as fun.
 

Niau

Well-Known Member
Dec 18, 2020
608
920
Necarney City
I started about age 45. My friend, who briefly taught snowboarding in Jackson Hole, got me into it with some slow easy runs on very flat, packed terrain. Technique really counts in those circumstances. The basic take away was 'Upper Body Rotation'. Gliding along at a walking pace you won't turn by banking like you do on a surfboard, or by sticking your butt out and 'jibbing'.
His method involved pointing where you want to go with the front arm/hand. Back arm is bent with forearm against chest and also pointing where you want to go. Sight down the forward arm and turn your head and torso in the direction you want to turn. Trust it, the board will turn. After a short while you can add steepness, speed, deep unpacked snow, etc., to the challenge, and then some of your surf style moves are applicable.
By the end of my first season we were hiking to summits and going off piste' in steep wooded, trackless, terrain.
Like surfing, putting the board on up on the rail is good form that will see you through. But it begins with upper body rotate, which is easier to remember after some repetition while going slow with the arms held as described above. Skidding through turns with your butt stuck out (jibbing) is for kooks.
 

kyle

Well-Known Member
Jun 2, 2010
669
406
All of this. I snowboarded before I started surfing.

Once you get the hang of it, POW DAYS WILL BE AMAZING. NOTHING LIKE IT.

Have fun and take your time. Your body will thank you.
 

jory

Well-Known Member
Dec 25, 2005
854
993
United Kingdom
I started about age 45. My friend, who briefly taught snowboarding in Jackson Hole, got me into it with some slow easy runs on very flat, packed terrain. Technique really counts in those circumstances. The basic take away was 'Upper Body Rotation'. Gliding along at a walking pace you won't turn by banking like you do on a surfboard, or by sticking your butt out and 'jibbing'.
His method involved pointing where you want to go with the front arm/hand. Back arm is bent with forearm against chest and also pointing where you want to go. Sight down the forward arm and turn your head and torso in the direction you want to turn. Trust it, the board will turn. After a short while you can add steepness, speed, deep unpacked snow, etc., to the challenge, and then some of your surf style moves are applicable.
By the end of my first season we were hiking to summits and going off piste' in steep wooded, trackless, terrain.
Like surfing, putting the board on up on the rail is good form that will see you through. But it begins with upper body rotate, which is easier to remember after some repetition while going slow with the arms held as described above. Skidding through turns with your butt stuck out (jibbing) is for kooks.
Actually the modern technique for
Turns involves keeping the upper body still and steering using foot pressure. Too much upper body rotation leads to bad habits
 




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