Range of length for noseriders

Souvlaks

Member
Feb 10, 2021
23
44
San Diego, CA
So...this may be a dumb question but lately I’ve been thinking about the ideal length of a noserider. Obviously this is a pretty personal topic due to style/weight/height/etc. but...

I’d be interested in hearing anyone’s thoughts on the ideal length of a noserider.

Im 6ft, ~185lbs, currently ride a 9’10 which works well for me, but when I start getting into the glider realm of 10’6+ they’re just too fast not to mention the number of steps needed to get up front. I’m debating testing out the 9’6 waters but that seems tiny now!


I’ve always been under the mindset that the longer the board, the easier it would be to noseride.

Anyways, just some random thoughts for this Saturday
 

FirstPointEric

Well-Known Member
May 9, 2010
4,599
829
USA California and Nashville, TNN
My favorite pure noserider is a 10'6" Mitch Taylor Model shaped by Jose Barahona at Becker. It's a classic, heavy (2 x 10 + 1 x 10 oz volan) log shaped from a classic weight blank with triple stringers and hd foam in between. Based on the ideas behind the Con Ugly, it has a wide, blunt nose (19.5-20"), a full 24.5" width mid-ship and wide ass tail (17") with a deep step. Awesome board that I let go when another gem caught my eye; happy to have circuitously gotten it back a couple years ago.
10'6 Mitch Taylor  bottom.JPG


10'6 Mitch Taylor bottom Up.jpg


10'6 Mitch Taylor rocker.JPG
 

Artz

Well-Known Member
Nov 22, 2018
980
794
Florida
Donald Takayama‘s Scorpion was made to be a nose rider for those small mush burger days.
The Scorpion is really fun ride. With that big concave not the best for paddling. But once you are up It says let the party begin. On a small point break you could do cheater fives. All morning from take off to your fin hitting the sand. Yes you can get ten over if you are in the pocket but with so little behind you It will take a nose dive. If you have the talent might be able to release the fin and spin the the board around. It also turns well. It was a great little board perfect for those summer evening after work Surfing and have fun in Leucadia.
So let’s say 6’to11’ but we can narrow that a bit to 9’ to 10’6”
As in all things your gas mileage may vary.
 

SeniorGrom

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2012
3,262
2,241
USA New Jersey
I agree with the above and FPE knows this category of surfboard riding discipline. One of the dimensions needed in my opinion is rail line. You just don’t have enough of that on boards under 9’6” regardless of rider height and weight. Thinking you have to take too many steps on longer logs could mean you need to sharpen that skill in both speed and accuracy. Lock the fin, get to the tip, and perch.
 

FirstPointEric

Well-Known Member
May 9, 2010
4,599
829
USA California and Nashville, TNN
I agree with the above and FPE knows this category of surfboard riding discipline. One of the dimensions needed in my opinion is rail line. You just don’t have enough of that on boards under 9’6” regardless of rider height and weight. Thinking you have to take too many steps on longer logs could mean you need to sharpen that skill in both speed and accuracy. Lock the fin, get to the tip, and perch.

*This*. Rail line is absolutely key, which is a big part of the reason so many of the best noseriders in history have been parallel-railed squaretails. Lots of tail kick and rail shape certainly are helpful too; some like more pinched rails, others like them rolled into tennis ball-shaped 50/50. The above MTM has more of a pinch than normal but are 50/50 and I love this board. Lastly, I’d argue that weight is crucial too because it translates into stability as you bottom turn, stall, let the board climb the face and do the waddle forward.

Well put, Neil.
 
Last edited:

WesCantDress

Well-Known Member
Mar 5, 2020
358
562
Long Beach, CA
I'm 6'1 and 180... when set up in the pocket, I can grab a solid ten on my 9'4. But, it's not as solid as I'd like. But to compare, on a very similar log at 10'0 in length the nose becomes more of a joy, and less of a Seal Team tactical strike. Feels like its the rail line, as mentioned above, in full effect.
 

Surfnfish

Well-Known Member
Feb 6, 2015
1,857
2,407
PNW between here and there
Morey's 65' nose riding contest was pretty much the apex of nose riding, who's who of perch time, and best of breed noseriders....won by Munoz on a Hobie Phil Edwards shape:

The Hobie Noserider was based around a completely opposite theory -no scoop, with a flat planing surface on the front third of the board and a concave bottom in that area.
The reason for the board's superior performance is that by having a flat planing section, it doesn't push water and lose speed.
By maintaining its speed, it maintains its lift.
The board also gains additional lift by the concave bottom section.
The board shown above is one of the radical versions with a wider nose and is wider over-all.
This board has proven to be an exceptionally fun board, especially in fast shore breaks.



1617401373500.png
 

Niau

Active Member
Dec 18, 2020
146
209
Necarney City
Morey's 65' nose riding contest was pretty much the apex of nose riding, who's who of perch time, and best of breed noseriders....won by Munoz on a Hobie Phil Edwards shape:

The Hobie Noserider was based around a completely opposite theory -no scoop, with a flat planing surface on the front third of the board and a concave bottom in that area.
The reason for the board's superior performance is that by having a flat planing section, it doesn't push water and lose speed.
By maintaining its speed, it maintains its lift.
The board also gains additional lift by the concave bottom section.
The board shown above is one of the radical versions with a wider nose and is wider over-all.
This board has proven to be an exceptionally fun board, especially in fast shore breaks.



View attachment 29206
Some say Hynson shoulda' won, Judges got it wrong. Assuming Mike and Skip were on a G&S noserider model, but what was that shape?
"Hobie Surfboards team, riding a number of boards specifically designed by Phil Edwards, won both natural and goofy first places."
However, "by a judging error ; Mike Hynson of San Deigo actually won."
- Kampion: Stoked (1997) page 103
.
sFrye_Skip_1965_Bp_Stretch_Gordon_Smith_California.jpg
 

Surfnfish

Well-Known Member
Feb 6, 2015
1,857
2,407
PNW between here and there
our posse of a dozen or so teenagers regularly swapped boards in the lineup, quite a mix, 9'8 seemed the most popular length...Weber Performers, Nuuhiwa Noseriders, HO's, Noll Cat, Con Ugly, Olson...Haut bump's and Yater spoons were popular...if you couldn't nose ride a Performer, you just couldn't noseride
 




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