Non-coastal Used Surfboards 4 Sale

Zzz

Well-Known Member
Aug 15, 2017
398
402
CA
Interesting. Since you saw it up close, what’s going on with the stringer in this board? It looks like a big dark stringer in the nose but none at all in the tail.
 

longboardkook

Active Member
Jun 19, 2020
100
105
Denver, ColoRADo
Interesting. Since you saw it up close, what’s going on with the stringer in this board? It looks like a big dark stringer in the nose but none at all in the tail.
Interesting. Since you saw it up close, what’s going on with the stringer in this board? It looks like a big dark stringer in the nose but none at all in the tail.
Not really a stringer. Just discoloration of the glass. Looks almost like the board is a pop out.
 

garagefull

Well-Known Member
Feb 22, 2004
456
356
Santa Cruz
Before I retired, my job required me to travel once or twice a month. Usually to the western half of the US, but sometimes farther. Before every trip I would search Craigslist in the city I was going to. I bought boards in Houston, Denver, Phoenix, Portland, Philly and more. I think I found at least 4 in a Phoenix. And these are boards like Cooperfish, vintage Yaters, Hansen’s and Surfboards Hawaii. The sellers story was usually something like “We moved to Denver and thought it would only be for 2 to 3 years so we brought our surfboard.” After many years, they realized they were not moving back to CA and decided to sell. I usually shipped them back by Amtrak. It was easier and cheaper than taking them on the plane with me.
 

Sax-son

Well-Known Member
Nov 23, 2019
753
795
Three Rivers, CA
My guess is now most of the those old relics have ended back (in collector's hands)up on the coasts where they belong. That's not to say there are not a few still out there in some remote out of the way place, but not worth the effort unless it is some really valuable find.

When I first started searching out old longboards, it was because I wasn't really liking the new boards being built. The Clark foam blanks at the time were rockered really funky and all the different boards that I was having shaped were "plow horses". It wasn't until Renny Yater re-shaped and created a new mold for Clark(10'1"Y) that the rocker thing was being corrected. After that, I started to wain on my search for vintage boards as I preferred newer and lighter boards. As far as I am concerned, there are still plenty of survivors from the mid to late 1960's for current shapers to use as reference. The last vintage longboard I bought was over 7 years ago and the only reason I would be interested in another would be purely for nostalgia. There are some great new surfboards being built today so that should be taken advantage of.
 




Top