Modern Yater Spoons

Zenzen

Member
Dec 9, 2021
38
96
Japan
Hey guys, I'm looking for some thoughts, feedback, info on the more contemporary Yater Spoons (last 10 years or so) and what people's experiences with them are? How they surf, bottom contours, rail profiles, weight etc. Any information appreciated!
 

Sax-son

Well-Known Member
Nov 23, 2019
1,639
1,969
High Sierras, CA
I have one that is 2 years old and is still a retro style surfboard. 50/50 rails, slightly more modern template then that of the 1960's and is a reasonable light surfboard. I hope that helps.
 

mightyrime

Well-Known Member
Nov 10, 2020
454
665
oceanside ca
I have 3 Yaters in my quiver right now. One of them is a 9'6" yater spoon that i am guessing is 10 to 15 years old.

I absolutely love it. It is in my opinion the best longboard I have ridden for its design intention. I mention design intention because it was not designed to be a noserider. I always describe the yater spoon as this.

Imagine an expert builder trying to design the first HPLB but in the 1960s with the design knowledge of that day. And being successful in his design intention and then maybe making some tweaks over the next 50 years but never a redesign.

My Yater Spoon Paddles fast, turn amazing, can take bigger drops, works in 1' to 6', flies down the line, trims amazing, is lightweight for it size, and does this all with while still feeling like a traditional longboard if that makes sense.

I believe the original design was for better waves, better hold, better maneuverability, better trim than the other logs of the time. Thats what it does.

But again it is not a noserider, it does not hold back in the pocket, it does not stall well, there is not much tail flip like many noseriders for the lock, its step deck and nose rocker make it hard to get all the way up on the nose and not sink. Its sweet spot for more up front trim is like 2' from the nose.

Are you in australia? Is it hard to find one there?
 

Sax-son

Well-Known Member
Nov 23, 2019
1,639
1,969
High Sierras, CA
But again it is not a noserider, it does not hold back in the pocket, it does not stall well, there is not much tail flip like many noseriders for the lock, its step deck and nose rocker make it hard to get all the way up on the nose and not sink. Its sweet spot for more up front trim is like 2' from the nose.
Good description, but although they are not necessarily designed as a noserider, I myself have gotten some decent nose rides with mine. One of the best noseriding boards I ever owned (not the spoon) was not at all considered a noserider model. So don't count one out completely.
 

mightyrime

Well-Known Member
Nov 10, 2020
454
665
oceanside ca
Funny so I have 2 very similar yater. Both almost exactly same dimensions but the blue one does not have a step deck, had slightly less nose rocker and weighs about 2lb more. And it is totally noserideable unlike the yellow one I have had for a while. Very different boards though they look almost the same.
 

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surfore

Well-Known Member
Mar 2, 2004
548
259
USA California
The model has changed/matured/evolved over the years. It seemed he was pigeonholed into the Spoon shaper. There was the “classic” release that had a “Spoon” lam though the Spoon never had a model lam. The board that was in the 2009 Sacred Craft was a 60’s Spoon. The Spoon Renny makes today has a more pulled in tail, and some other modifications.

Ah the old Beach House boardroom. At least 35 Yater’s on the racks, some by Renny and some by Lauren but who knew (only if you could tell the difference in the shape of their “Y” in the sig). And that rack with the Owl, Ike, Yater, ummm boards on it. And the Liddles that came with the sandpaper, Brom fish, Jacobs by Wayne Rich, Andersons, Freelines, Wilderness….and then a few Coopers, not for sale, because they were ridden by the shop guys. That used board room was awesome.
 

Zenzen

Member
Dec 9, 2021
38
96
Japan
I have 3 Yaters in my quiver right now. One of them is a 9'6" yater spoon that i am guessing is 10 to 15 years old.

I absolutely love it. It is in my opinion the best longboard I have ridden for its design intention. I mention design intention because it was not designed to be a noserider. I always describe the yater spoon as this.

Imagine an expert builder trying to design the first HPLB but in the 1960s with the design knowledge of that day. And being successful in his design intention and then maybe making some tweaks over the next 50 years but never a redesign.

My Yater Spoon Paddles fast, turn amazing, can take bigger drops, works in 1' to 6', flies down the line, trims amazing, is lightweight for it size, and does this all with while still feeling like a traditional longboard if that makes sense.

I believe the original design was for better waves, better hold, better maneuverability, better trim than the other logs of the time. Thats what it does.

But again it is not a noserider, it does not hold back in the pocket, it does not stall well, there is not much tail flip like many noseriders for the lock, its step deck and nose rocker make it hard to get all the way up on the nose and not sink. Its sweet spot for more up front trim is like 2' from the nose.

Are you in australia? Is it hard to find one there?
Thanks mate, that's an awesome reply - exactly what I was looking for. I was in Australia, buy have relocated to Japan for work for a few years. I've never seen a Yater on the West Coast of Oz of any description, but there are here in Japan. One came up for sale, hence my post, but has sold just as quickly unfortunately. But really appreciate the feedback.
 

Sax-son

Well-Known Member
Nov 23, 2019
1,639
1,969
High Sierras, CA
The model has changed/matured/evolved over the years. It seemed he was pigeonholed into the Spoon shaper.
On this one subject, I have to respectively disagree. Yes! He is known for designing and shaping the spoon, but how many surfboards did he shape between the years of 1968 to 1981? I can tell you that most were not Spoons. I rode Yater short boards mostly through the 1970s into the early 1980s and they were my go-to all throughout that decade.
 




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