I need to make an omlette

Discussion in 'Surfing' started by Clomics, Mar 21, 2019.

  1. Clomics

    Clomics Active Member

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    Nov 5, 2012


    With one video, in my eyes, eggs went from shameful to miracle. What I can tell from the vid, he's riding a Takayama (yellow), and an FCD (blue). Both look nice. Anybody want to chime in on eggs that have worked well for them?
     
  2. cuda

    cuda Well-Known Member

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    once you get beyond thinking of them as "funboards" they become one of the most functional boards across a wide variety of conditions. Singles, 2 + 1's, thusters, quads, twins and bonzers take your pick all work equally well on an egg. IMO if you are not wed to the HPSB as the be all end all, an egg rockered and fined up for the waves you surf is the perfect one board quiver. For surfing so. Cal waves I would think a mid 6' - mid 7' CB bonzer speed egg would be all i'd ever need. That is if I didnt have surfboard ADD.

    If you are mixing one into your quiver a single or 2+1 at 7' (ish) would be a good starting point. If you like shorter get more fins.

    Devon wrote a 1 pager for TSJ 25.6 if you want more "kool-aid."
     
  3. hankster

    hankster Active Member

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    Nov 12, 2013
    USA California
    Campbell Bros, E-Wing Speed Egg (more pulled in nose). I've owned them in 6'8"-8', work great in smaller waves, excel in good waves. Heck, IIRC, I have an 8'5" that needs to be christened. Too many Eggs!
     
    Clomics likes this.
  4. hankster

    hankster Active Member

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    Nov 12, 2013
    USA California
    Another versatile design is the Quadmatic by Robin Mair. Wide point back, plenty of volume and custom made fins, as well as fin system, make for a quiver killer.
     
    Artz likes this.
  5. Nilus

    Nilus Active Member

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    Agree with Cuda and hankster and I've said it on other threads ... My 6'4 Bonzer egg (5 fins) is the most surfed of any board I own (lots). Goes on every trip and is in the car when I don't know what to expect. Surfed it from under knee high to well overhead. Heck, I surfed it at Rincon today. :)
     
    hankster likes this.
  6. Chilly Willy

    Chilly Willy Well-Known Member

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    Can someone school me on the difference between an egg and something like the Vaquero? Is it just a matter of planing vs. hull bottoms?
     
  7. Mbaltazar

    Mbaltazar Member

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    Mar 17, 2019
    Portugal

    I always ride Logs except when I ride my 7'2'' mid-lenght. It's my go to board for when it's bigger, a shitty beachbreak day, our when I don't know what to expect. Even when I take a log, I take the 7'2'' along. It's a hand shaped single fin, with very refined rails and a concave to double concave to slight v from middle to the tail. It rips...
     

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  8. glider_boy

    glider_boy Active Member

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    Others on here are far more knowledgeable about the subject than I am, and I wouldn't say its *just* the bottoms. But FWIW on a Vaquero you will have a hull bottom whereas on an egg you are likely to have concave(s) and a more pronounced hard edge in the tail.

    For me personally, I would have more of a tendency to ride a hull on lined up and/or softer waves and would go for an egg in conditions that are steeper and more beachbreak-y (though mine work in pretty much any conditions that have a decent amount of push). That said, my Vaquero is a glider-length model and I'm not frequently choosing between that and an egg (my eggs are 7'2" and 7'10").

    If you are looking for something that blends the egg / hull concepts a bit, as I understand it Hilbers' eggs are a bit of a hybrid.

    Hopefully someone else will chime in who can better address this.
     
    Chilly Willy likes this.
  9. Nilus

    Nilus Active Member

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    Historically speaking, and someone can correct me if I'm wrong, the egg is really just the outline of a shorter board with a rounded nose and rounded tail as originally conceived by Skip Frye. From that basic template, and in the many decades since, a whole range of boards blossomed ... including many specialized designs, fin setups, bottom contours, etc.

    These days, I think it's a matter of who you're talking to and how much knowledge they have. I imagine most would consider modern-day eggs a very large category that uses the template above and includes tri fins, 2 + 1, bonzer setups, and singles to a slightly lesser extent.

    When the boards start to take on bladed rails, rolled bottoms, flexier fins, and all that (and typically go single) ... they commonly split off into that offshoot category of "hull" whether a true Liddle displacement hull or at least something related but a bit less extreme.

    In the end, I think the language is imperfect. Sort of high-level nebulous terminology that doesn't fully describe a specific board made by a specific shaper.

    Just me personally, and only thinking about my little California experiences ... I think of the San Diego guys as egg shapers. Ditto for Malcolm. Then, the SB and Malibu guys have their own hull design thread thing going on. It's kind of interesting to think about it that way from a geographical perspective. Gives a little more insight into why the egg template veered off in different directions based on the waves those people were typically surfing. Of course, both my Liddle and my CB egg go great at the points. =^)
     
    Chilly Willy likes this.
  10. Clomics

    Clomics Active Member

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    Nov 5, 2012
    The Campbell Bros. eggs look very nice. Thanks everyone for your input.

    Has anyone had any time on a Mitsven egg?
     

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