Fowler V8, Andreini McVee, others?

DanSan

Well-Known Member
Jun 7, 2012
2,723
1,932
Soquel,CA
7This is my 8.2..with new fin from japsom
44211069_1990545617651007_399360816689709056_o.jpg
 

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Bruce Fowler

Well-Known Member
Jul 28, 2018
1,187
2,027
California
There is another thread currently running on Jamz about whether history is important or not. Whereas that may be up for debate among members, if you asked an archaeologist you would get a definitive "yes of course it is"!

When it comes down to how we remember events of the past, I have always had some innate desire to have a sense of Who did What When. As it says in the Midget Farrelly link, as people age they tend to twist history or remember it differently to suit themselves......... or, at least something to that effect. This is largely the reason why I called Rostoker out on his bullshit claim of creating a surfboard design that was pretty much a utility shape in the early 1970's. Interesting that Midget uses the term "hijack" which I have also alluded to in previous posts on Sways & other media. Give credit where credit is due!

In other posts of WHO did WHAT first, I stated that in the world of V bottoms, I credit Midget & Dick Graham's photo and account that Midget preceded McT on the modern V Bottom surfboard. Both Marc & I have known and have individually interacted with George (Greenough) over many years. Recently Greg Huglin, a mutual friend to all of us, now living in Australia, asked GG outright who was first between Midget and McTavish. George replied, ""Midget, no contest". George has known all the parties involved and has absolutely no commercial interests nor agenda that would prompt him to color it one way or another.

IMHO, I think the true, first vee bottom was most likely the "Hotcurl" surfboard that was an attempt to steer the finless surfboards better until Tom Blake came up with the concept of adding the first "skeg" aka fin on a surfboard.
I also surmised, where Midget admits he only built one V Bottom before going on to other designs, it is probably fair to give McTavish the lion's share of credit for "popularizing" the design over the distinction of DESIGNING the first one. Again, it's a CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE, and not wholly unlike how I feel Rostoker should accept and be regarded for embracing a previously popular design versus trying to "hijack" it and making it his original brainchild. (Footnote: I find it ironic that recently someone half my age "told me" McTavish then Stoker created the fee bottoms that I am shaping........ copying them! I guess he read the Stoker website "real story behind the stoke" where after spending nearly ten years of my doing virtually everything to bring "his design" to the forefront, I am curiously absent from the history. What's that smell? Does anyone hear a sucking sound?

How about having an ounce of grace and saying thank you instead? Somehow I know how Midget felt and it was an honor a few years ago we he contacted me through Swaybacks asking if he could call me. We had a great chat that lasted nearly an hour, and all I can say is the man was a total class act.

All the aforementioned history may seem a natural assumption to many of the older members on Swaybacks, Jamz, and the world at large, but unless you have a few watchdogs out there 'keeping people honest' the younger surfers will read something online, accept it as "truth" while not knowing they are embracing fiction over fantasy.

Keep it real dudes & dudettes!

And here is the link to Midget's website that discuss the "first" V Bottom among other historical events from "Downunder".
https://www.farrellysurfboards.com
----------------------------------------------------
Here is Marc's description of the McVee as it appears on the Mollusk site.

In 1967 when Bob McTavish started experimenting with Vee bottom surfboards the first one he made was 9'4". He was impressed at how well it would ride the nose. Of course he was also amazed at how well it turned. After several days of testing however he decided that the goal was to go shorter and have even more maneuverability. As we all know this Vee bottom blazed into existence the short board revolution which started in December 1967 when Nat Young surfed his 9'4" Vee-bottom at Honolua Bay.
I offer the McVee as the spiritual successor to those original boards. The longer ones have wonderful nose riding capabilities along with excellent turning. The shorter ones just have fabulous trim and turning capabilities. At any length the boards are designed for 2 foot 6 foot waves that would generally be favorable for a long boarding. However these boards are more maneuverable and faster than a longboard and in my opinion a lot more fun. Size range: 8' -9'6". Rolled bottom and deck with Vee ahead of the fin. Flat behind the fin box so that the board will come right out of the bottom turn and change direction with out tracking over the back of the wave like the original design.


8'4 Andreini McVee Clear

$1,100.00




In 1967 when Bob McTavish started experimenting with Vee bottom surfboards the first one he made was 9'4". He was impressed at how well it would ride the nose. Of course he was also amazed at how well it turned. After several days of testing however he decided that the goal was to go shorter and have even more maneuverability. As we all know this Vee bottom blazed into existence the short board revolution which started in December 1967 when Nat Young surfed his 9'4" Vee-bottom at Honolua Bay.
I offer the McVee as the spiritual successor to those original boards. The longer ones have wonderful nose riding capabilities along with excellent turning. The shorter ones just have fabulous trim and turning capabilities. At any length the boards are designed for 2 foot 6 foot waves that would generally be favorable for a long boarding. However these boards are more maneuverable and faster than a longboard and in my opinion a lot more fun. Size range: 8' -9'6". Rolled bottom and deck with Vee ahead of the fin. Flat behind the fin
 
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Bruce Fowler

Well-Known Member
Jul 28, 2018
1,187
2,027
California
"HIS STORY"............. BUT DOES IT = HISTORY?

photo by Dick Graham from Midget Farrelly Surfboards web site

Midget Farrelly’s mid 1967 stringerless ‘v-bottom’ square tail ridden in Sydney at the Windansea meet in November 1967. According to Midget’s website, the board was designed and in the water long before McTavish and Nat Young ‘went vertical’ at Honolua Bay at the end of that year.
 

Bruce Fowler

Well-Known Member
Jul 28, 2018
1,187
2,027
California
APPLES TO ORANGES........... VASTLY DIFFERENT RIDES............. BOTH FUN!

Farrelly, putting it on a rail. Photo by Dick Graham, taken from his book “The Ride: 1960s and 1970s, A Photo Essay”
 

Bruce Fowler

Well-Known Member
Jul 28, 2018
1,187
2,027
California
BF Wide Tail V Bottom 1981.jpg
BF V Machine b4 V Machine 1981.jpg
This board was made 38 years ago............. turns 39 this summer.

Does it bear a resemblance to anything?

No disrespect meant toward Scott, but if you read his website, he states he "began shaping in the early 80's in his back yard" - the same time this board was made.

However if you read the Stoker website, the claim is that "the first Stoker V was made by Rostoker looking at different boards @ Scott's shop, then asking Anderson to make a custom with the combinations.

The next time some punk wants to give me heat for "copying" Rostoker's "original design" I will be a gentleman and just tell them to Google the history of such boards to enlighten themselves.

The difference between ignorance & stupidity is an ignorant person simply didn't know, then learns from their mistakes.... while the stupid one continues to repeat the same mistake over & over again.

At the end of the day, life is too short for such petty distractions.

Correction: Cut & pasted from the Anderson website: "Started in 1988 by Scott Anderson in his back garden before moving to their present location in California".
 
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Kingkook

Active Member
Jul 27, 2014
201
41
Awesome thread.
I’ve owned both.
I’ve had an 8-5 and 8-6 V8’s (non custom to me.. picked up
used and I still own a 9-4 Mcvee (also non custom picked up used)
The reason for selling the V8’s had nothing to do with their lack of performance. They are great boards.. not a single shitty session on them.
I believe the V8 was made to be pushed harder.. more leaning and back foot action..The McVee feels more cruisy. Both are trim machines.
The Mcvee has noseriding capabilities that I didn’t experience with the V8 (perhaps bc of their size difference)
My Mcvee feels more sensitive..maybe bc it’s stringerless. I ride the Mcvee like a longboard and the V8 like a mid length. The McVee comes back to pocket after bottom turn in typical Vaquero form.
upload_2019-12-26_8-13-42.png


upload_2019-12-26_8-14-8.png


Those pics are on the 9-4 Stringerless McVee.

Im going to order another V8 from Bruce soon, a balsa would be epic.
I love dealing with Bruce. I feel honored and lucky to have him accessible.

In summary -both are great boards that share a single characteristic, expressed differently and everything else is totally different.. don’t choose one, buy both.

Anyways.. my worthless .02
 

Ricksurfin

Well-Known Member
Jun 9, 2019
1,782
3,031
San Clemente, CA
I haven’t been into this thread much, as it seems more likes a sales ad then an informative post, but that history post by you Bruce was a very good read. Excellent post, thank you.
 

DanSan

Well-Known Member
Jun 7, 2012
2,723
1,932
Soquel,CA
Thank you bruce...i appreciate..
.it..and all you guys who dedicate yourselves to shaping..being craftsmen/women..
History is very important...knowing who did what ..when..how...even why..
Giving credit and respect..

As opposed to the moochers..and scammers..hijackers..
The karma wheel may spin slow sometimes..but
It comes for all...
 

Bruce Fowler

Well-Known Member
Jul 28, 2018
1,187
2,027
California
To King: Spot on....... the rolled (round) bottom of the McVee definitely will feel more sensitive to most riders opposed to my combinations of flat bottom & flat panel vee. I use round bottoms to sensitize my "Platypus" but wasn't aft that effect on my "V8's". Spot on observances about the riding differences of the two boards.

Ricksurfin: I try to not get too "commercialized" in what I post, however everyone knows I'm in business and making surfboards for a living (well partially, I think if I had to exist solely on income from surfboards, I'd probably be sitting down on a freeway ramp with a sign saying "WILL SHAPE FOR FOOD".

I hope members will take the time to read Midget's comments on how he viewed the history of surfing in Australia and the perception that Americans and most of the world now holds as historical truth. Dick Graham's photos and comments recollecting that time are of particular interest, as is George Greenough's comment that Greg (Huglin) solicited. Midget's competitive record eclipses Nat's. Midget was an innovative & top quality surfboard designer and manufacturer, as well as the quintessential foamer of the highest quality Australian blanks. He never got his due, and this was largely attributed to the fact that he chose not to smoke pot when everyone else was turning on. It was a personal choice that took strong conviction of what was right for him at the expense of being ostracized by his peers. The magazines & media unjustly shunned him, but he accomplished tremendous success nonetheless.

Bottom line for me is to post some information that may shed some light on preconceived notions other than what is commonly believed. McTavish was, and is, a very creative, shaper/designer & still stoked surfer richly deserving of acclaim by his peers. The other guy (Rostoker) is an easy to like guy, yearning to be a legend remembered in a convenient, at least partially made up history that simply isn't true. I feel sorry for people feeling the need to claim something they aren't nor ever have been. I was raised by a generation that weren't afraid to tell you if they thought you were full of shit. Guys that died on the shores of Normandy doing what they felt was necessary & right.

Accolades belong to people that have gone through the years of hard work and discipline in a craft providing people with equipment they highly value for recreation and escaping our stress filled world. In my book, a person needs to EARN THEIR FAME rather than become famous riding other people's coat tails.

Surfers are famous for 'talking story' and young impressionable minds sometimes can't differentiate fact from fiction. This is the era of misinformation and "fake news". Be discerning, question authority, but respect your elders.

I say, put it out there and let people decide for themselves what they choose to believe. We are fortunate enough to live in a country that allows each individual to choose the path they want to pursue.

"Whattaya gonna be when you grow up"?

"Famous"

"Famous for what"?

"........for nothing, just famous".
 
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