can anyone help me better understand (surf) nostalgia

shapewright

Well-Known Member
Aug 6, 2006
966
1,093
USA California
As a senior surfer who first heard of and experienced surfing in late 1960.
The other grey beards that I know have said the same things over and over, the youth of today has not the slightest idea of what it was like 6 decades ago.
Looked for someone to surf with, surfboards suddenly began to improve at the speed of light.
It truly was the golden years and I’m glad my children did not go hung ho to be active surfers.
The crowded conditions of the very limited actual “spots”, the youth have so little respect for the elders or anyone who is not part of their clic.
The older group regulated what went on a spots, encouraging youngsters with potential, banishing A holes.
I hear, no one is a local today, but a little respect goes a long way at an out of town break.
I could ramble on for hours, but at this point in time, nostalgia is about all we have to hang on to
 

Zufeldt

Member
Apr 6, 2021
77
86
Los Angeles
I was just a kid in the 60s. Some of the older bigger teenagers surfed. I remember long hair, beatniks, bigots, gay people, hippies, bikers and ladies with no bras among many others. There was a relaxed decency amongst all kinds and races that I recall. It seems in those days people were diversifying with a common thread of appreciating right from wrong that they let their youngers see, youngers like myself.

So that’s the extent of my knowledge of surf nostalgia. There’s a forty year void for me from that point on as I was still a boy when we left the beach.

Enter the modern day. I got a boogie board at 49 and hit the water, then came my first surfboard and wondering what the hell I was doing. My first wetsuit came along after Thanksgiving. What a godsend that was. That’s it. I’d just flounder, work at it and ride day after day the year through into the next and again again. Sometimes I wonder what it would have been like if I had stayed and turned teenager surfer and had years of surf experiences, abilities and moments under my belt like so many folks have that I now come in contact with.

But that’s not the case and I kind of agree with others in this thread that it’s more your involvement with surfing that makes it deeper and from there your own nostalgia is forged.
 
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cuda

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2007
1,867
1,453
no need to complicate this...we were young, our bodies glowed with health, and our dicks were always hard....50 years later, not so much...
Actually, despite my seemingly dismissive response, really does some it up. You really got me thinking further about stuff I'd conveniently forgotten.
Nostalgia as such seems to be proportional to the feeling of ones past, their youth(fulness) perhaps in this case, as idyllic. For many here it seems that it probably was a wonderful time and hence the great stories and memories.
This was just not my reality. The 1st 10-12 years of my life I bounced around from one shitty step-family situation to another every 6-month or so and I never established meaningful friendships or solid memories other than that the beach was always near. By 15 I was a drunk drug addled degenerate living on my own hand to mouth and on my way to being expelled from high school. My 20's and 30's were just a shit show of attempts to keep my head above water. An good memories during this time are lost in the haze. This definitely explains ( to me at least) why surfing was/is an escape rather that a mirror for admiring how bitchen life once was.
 

txgrinder

Active Member
Jan 11, 2020
117
126
Surfside Beach, TX
As a senior surfer who first heard of and experienced surfing in late 1960.
The other grey beards that I know have said the same things over and over, the youth of today has not the slightest idea of what it was like 6 decades ago.
Looked for someone to surf with, surfboards suddenly began to improve at the speed of light.
It truly was the golden years and I’m glad my children did not go hung ho to be active surfers.
The crowded conditions of the very limited actual “spots”, the youth have so little respect for the elders or anyone who is not part of their clic.
The older group regulated what went on a spots, encouraging youngsters with potential, banishing A holes.
I hear, no one is a local today, but a little respect goes a long way at an out of town break.
I could ramble on for hours, but at this point in time, nostalgia is about all we have to hang on to

I don't think much more needs to be said after this, Jim. Great words and wise words.
 
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Basenji703

Well-Known Member
Apr 2, 2014
818
552
Virginia Beach, VA
As a senior surfer who first heard of and experienced surfing in late 1960.
The other grey beards that I know have said the same things over and over, the youth of today has not the slightest idea of what it was like 6 decades ago.
Looked for someone to surf with, surfboards suddenly began to improve at the speed of light.
It truly was the golden years and I’m glad my children did not go hung ho to be active surfers.
The crowded conditions of the very limited actual “spots”, the youth have so little respect for the elders or anyone who is not part of their clic.
The older group regulated what went on a spots, encouraging youngsters with potential, banishing A holes.
I hear, no one is a local today, but a little respect goes a long way at an out of town break.
I could ramble on for hours, but at this point in time, nostalgia is about all we have to hang on to
This is interesting. I grew up in Monmouth County (Little Silver) and my second surfboard was a Challenger Eastern received in May/June 1967. We probably surfed many of the same breaks there. This is what I remember as well and I have many of the same refections. Surfing now at First Street in Virginia Beach I see first hand the chaos that lack of common decency and respect for the old rules brings. It's a shame. Oh well!!!! Things change and we have to adapt.
 

kpd73

Well-Known Member
May 8, 2013
3,013
2,479
USA Rhode Island
Actually, despite my seemingly dismissive response, really does some it up. You really got me thinking further about stuff I'd conveniently forgotten.
Nostalgia as such seems to be proportional to the feeling of ones past, their youth(fulness) perhaps in this case, as idyllic. For many here it seems that it probably was a wonderful time and hence the great stories and memories.
This was just not my reality. The 1st 10-12 years of my life I bounced around from one shitty step-family situation to another every 6-month or so and I never established meaningful friendships or solid memories other than that the beach was always near. By 15 I was a drunk drug addled degenerate living on my own hand to mouth and on my way to being expelled from high school. My 20's and 30's were just a shit show of attempts to keep my head above water. An good memories during this time are lost in the haze. This definitely explains ( to me at least) why surfing was/is an escape rather that a mirror for admiring how bitchen life once was.

I was just going to simply post- "I don't think you're wired that way..."
And now I can see why not.

And for all this you've been through, I know guys that have been through less and ended up worse.
You're one of the good ones for sure man.
Glad to know you.
 




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