Building a Paipo?

samb

Member
Apr 6, 2021
28
51
Santa Cruz CA
what does the cut channel above the graphic do? I see the other board has one as well. Is it a grip for the hand?
Brian is the design expert, but I see it serving three purposes:

1. allows for a much deeper belly (was going for a Velo-esque design here) without having significant weight and thickness through the paipo
2. grip, the ridge is a good area to rest your hand on the deck and push through turns
3. aesthetics, looks intricate and pretty :)
 

samb

Member
Apr 6, 2021
28
51
Santa Cruz CA
That template is much like the plywood boards long ridden in HI, often in large waves. Those boards tended to be larger, if I'm remembering correctly. It seems there are as many ideas as to what works for a paipo as there are paipo boarders. I need to cover ground to chase down peaks where I surf, so neutral buoyancy would neutralize my wave count. Boards like the Longship appear to be just a step removed from body surfing with little to recommend them over a boogie board, except for being hand made wood and super easy to duck dive.
I’d agree mostly, but would say these are far from a boogie experience. Probably closer to a mat ridden with proper (low) inflation. They plane out fantastically, and with the belly up front and sharp edges in the tail, they accomplish much of what a transitional volume displacement hull can. For reference, I ride these in waist high shorepound to head high point breaks. I’d contend the illusion of speed is higher than any of my 4GFs.
 

jory

Well-Known Member
Dec 25, 2005
789
818
United Kingdom
95505BA2-22EC-4015-B38D-63122EC9D82C.jpeg
I’ve posted this before, I can measure it for you if you like.

It’s marine ply that’s been bent to give a tiny bit of nose rocker. It’s been bent into a concave across from about where the logo is and out of the back.

I can easily catch waves too small to surf standing up as long as they have a little zip. Agreed it’s barely buoyant but it theres enough that you aren’t quite swimming and it planes quickly.

If you add too much foam it’s basically a hard body board in my opinion and not quite the same thing. In the uk it’s called belly boarding....
 
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nedsurf

Well-Known Member
Jan 22, 2005
3,210
1,381
Here is one I shaped from plywood. Belly in the nose tapered to a v in the tail, dished deck. Heaviest of my paipos. It's just wood, go ahead and experiment.
 

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Niau

Well-Known Member
Dec 18, 2020
519
794
Necarney City
View attachment 34556 I’ve posted this before, I can measure it for you if you like.

It’s marine ply that’s been bent to give a tiny bit of nose rocker. It’s been bent into a concave across from about where the logo is and out of the back.

I can easily catch waves too small to surf standing up as long as they have a little zip. Agreed it’s barely buoyant but it theres enough that you aren’t quite swimming and it planes quickly.

If you add too much foam it’s basically a hard body board in my opinion and not quite the same thing. In the uk it’s called belly boarding....
Bending plywood in more than one plane is a trick. Moreso if it's got concave and nose rocker. I wonder if it's a special glue-up?
 

jory

Well-Known Member
Dec 25, 2005
789
818
United Kingdom
Bending plywood in more than one plane is a trick. Moreso if it's got concave and nose rocker. I wonder if it's a special glue-up?
Dunno!

The bends are in different places so it’s only one plane in each area and there’s a flat area between where the nose finishes and the concave starts that makes sense?
 

paipodude

Active Member
Oct 27, 2019
134
151
Maryland, or By-the-Sea
There are no absolute answers to your questions about design. Maybe some more straightforward answers to questions on materials and construction techniques, for foam/glass, composites and wood.

There are tons of reason for neutral buoyancy with a critical one being able to duck dive (e.g., Ocean Beach, San Francisco). Float can also be a big benefit but one probably would like a channel to paddle out through. Your riding style may also dictate your design parameters.

If you plan to arm and kick paddle for waves then a board generally 70 percent of your height keeps the knees clear from the tail of the board (or, up to your sternum). For kicking you will want swim fins--there are tons of popular styles/brands but foot fit is the most important variable (and consider feet come in roughly five toe shape profiles, then there are arches, wide and narrow feet). After fit comes fin water resistance/propulsion which is governed by several variables (blade length, blade stiffness, rubber/plastic composition, floatability, etc.).

Generally, a paipo doesn't want or need much rocker as the planning surface isn't that long on a 40 to 60 inch board yet the body is spread along the length of the board. Some rocker is good, some nose flip may be useful.

Nearly all my boards are 50 inches long (my wood Xylem is about 48 inches long, a tad narrower and slightly thinner), poly foam/glass. My widths vary from 19-7/8 to 20-1/2 inches and general thicknesses from 1-7/8 to 2-1/2 inches thick, although some taper to thinner rails and some have more of a full thickness to the rail (of course my Bonzer boards are thinner in the concaves). I started on single fin paipos in the late-1960s; later moved to 3-fins and my Bonzer boards use 5 fins. FCS makes for good side fin boxes and a standard Fins Unlimited center fin (I like the flexibility of being able to adjust the trailing edge relative to tail). There are a number of available small side bites with single or double FCS male plugs--positioning and fin sizes can make a big difference.

Lots of discussions and opinions on the paipo forums. No registration required to read, but need registration to post. Tons of opinions. A few knowledgeable shapers participate and others with a range of materials experiences. Tons of opinions! We keep it cordial and talk about what we like and why. Folks ride everything from mini-paipos to SUP paipos, and some are dialed-in to customized paipo longboards (long as in 7 to 9 ft).

Forums: https://mypaipoboards.org/forum3/
General: https://mypaipoboards.org/
 




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