Are Aussie Style Noseriders Back in Style?

Sax-son

Well-Known Member
Nov 23, 2019
619
600
Three Rivers, CA
1966 Jacobs surfboards ad. The Hot Dog Model was the standard shape across the major manufacturers during that era. The more parallel railed 'Speed Shape' became prominent soon after, with model names like Lance Carson Model, Barry Kaniapuuni Model, Trestle Special, etc.
Nose riders were different beasts altogether, wider overall with platform noses and, often, concaves up front.
View attachment 29266
I use to own one of those Jacobs Semi Speed Shapes 9' 10". They were fantastic on point break waves like C-Street and Rincon, but not so hot on the beach breaks. Since I rode those spots a lot back then so it was not much of an issue. However, my buddy borrowed it one weekend and got busted in a marijuana raid somewhere. They confiscated his Volkwagen van and the surfboard was inside. He never saw either again. Feeling guilty, he paid me $80.00 for the board which I used to buy a Bing Nuuhiwa lightweight from a friend. The Bing was a way better all around board which I kept for many years after. I was pretty much done with the Jacobs anyway.
 

jory

Well-Known Member
Dec 25, 2005
561
356
United Kingdom
Feel like I should stick my oar in again here.

it’s true the templates are really reminiscent of those early 60s pigs BUT the modern boards we are taking about are quite different.

the rails are much more refined, overall foil is thinner and the bottoms are much flatter. The 4a style fin vs a d fin makes a difference too.
 

Niau

Active Member
Dec 18, 2020
146
209
Necarney City
And the modern boards are not glassed super heavy either
Yes, quite different, because in addition to the things you list, ‘Pig’ shapes from mid-century had nose measurements not much over 15” or so. That’s narrow. The result is a wide point well behind center and extra curve behind that wide point, aka ‘hips’. The standard board of the early 60’s, aka ‘Hot Dog’ shape, also had well defined hips, which began to diminish with the advent of the parallel rail ‘speed shape’. Parallel rails stayed vogue through the noserider era as nose widths often went past 18”. The original Sam broke away from that trend and the rest is history.
 
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jory

Well-Known Member
Dec 25, 2005
561
356
United Kingdom
Good point!

nose widths on these modern boards are around 17.5 ish. Wide point is still behind centre but maybe not quite as far
 

Artz

Well-Known Member
Nov 22, 2018
980
794
Florida
The early pigs were vary different then the Boards that were being built in Australia around late1965 and1966 You just have look at Nat Young’s Magic Sam was 9’4”. For a man of his size the Board was considered short. 9’6” was normal for a light weights. 10 foot was pretty normal. You have to remember that Nose riding, hanging-ten was dominating Surfing in California. Nat taking the world title was shocking. McTavish has a Model Noosa 66. He says from a template that he has been using from ..... drum roll yes you guessed it from 1966. The nose is wider wide point is below center but not as piggish the late 1950’s and early 1960s. take a look at Pieter‘s web page and you can see the the difference between the two.
 

Niau

Active Member
Dec 18, 2020
146
209
Necarney City
...And Sam featured a refined, high aspect ratio fin. Nat's win in O'side shook up the California nose riding obsession, to judge by all the ink spilt in the surf mags at the time. But until recently I'd forgotten that he also took 2nd in the '65 World Championships behind Felipe Pomar in Peru. He was a scrawny youngster then, competing against all the heavies in good size, unruly, surf.
Considering that Midget also beat all the heavies to become World Champ in '64, it shouldn't have been such a surprise that Australians had something going on with their approach to boards and how to ride 'em.
 
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jory

Well-Known Member
Dec 25, 2005
561
356
United Kingdom
I think the best way to think of it is a design arc that starts with the 50’s pigs a la velzy, that’s updated to the more functional “hot dog” shape.

Those boards get neglected as nose riding goes off.

Nat and co rediscover the older shape whilst looking for more performance and update it with the design innovations of the day - less foam, width Greenough fin.

Shortboard revolution dumps all of it.

Traditional longboarding resurgence led by Tudor and co with a focus on noseriding. Nuuhiwa in 66 is elevated to god like status again.

Modern technique, ability and design improvements make noseriding “easy” and a bit dull for some so they go looking for a board that still allows noseriding, still allows a traditional style but that is more lively and allows more radical turning. Modern design refinement is applied to the old Sam template and you get the boards we are talking about in the title.

They aren’t pigs, they are “piggish”. Involvement style is an easy nomenclature because it’s how the Aussies described it in 66/67.

To be clear, there’s no reinvention just refinement and rediscovery.

Worth noting that Devon Howard’s Old takayama model was along these lines back in 1999. I also think Alex knost deserves some credit for influencing this latest trend. His Robert August model was pretty similar in template again in 99/00 and is boards and longboard surfing since have developed into a style that’s as much rail engaged turning as tip riding

Also, as an aside, the other change happening in 66/67 ( if you believe Nat ) is a change in foot placement. He claims ( in his book ) that just prior to the 66 worlds, he started to cut back with both feet across (at right angles to) the stringer rather than the front foot angle and back foot parallel of a drop knee position. He claims that’s partly what made his turns more radical and opened the door to the contemporary style of today.

In reality I’m sure others were doing the same concurrently
 
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Niau

Active Member
Dec 18, 2020
146
209
Necarney City
I think the best way to think of it is a design arc that starts with the 50’s pigs a la velzy, that’s updated to the more functional “hot dog” shape.

Those boards get neglected as nose riding goes off.

Nat and co rediscover the older shape whilst looking for more performance and update it with the design innovations of the day - less foam, width Greenough fin.

Shortboard revolution dumps all of it.

Traditional longboarding resurgence led by Tudor and co with a focus on noseriding. Nuuhiwa in 66 is elevated to god like status again.

Modern technique, ability and design improvements make noseriding “easy” and a bit dull for some so they go looking for a board that still allows noseriding, still allows a traditional style but that is more lively and allows more radical turning. Modern design refinement is applied to the old Sam template and you get the boards we are talking about in the title.

They aren’t pigs, they are “piggish”. Involvement style is an easy nomenclature because it’s how the Aussies described it in 66/67.

To be clear, there’s no reinvention just refinement and rediscovery.

Worth noting that Devon Howard’s Old takayama model was along these lines back in 1999. I also think Alex knost deserves some credit for influencing this latest trend. His Robert August model was pretty similar in template again in 99/00 and is boards and longboard surfing since have developed into a style that’s as much rail engaged turning as tip riding

Also, as an aside, the other change happening in 66/67 ( if you believe Nat ) is a change in foot placement. He claims ( in his book ) that just prior to the 66 worlds, he started to cut back with both feet across (at right angles to) the stringer rather than the front foot angle and back foot parallel of a drop knee position. He claims that’s partly what made his turns more radical and opened the door to the contemporary style of today.

In reality I’m sure others were doing the same concurrently
It was a very interesting time. I suspect that all those relatively empty first class point breaks down under did a lot to advance the sport in Australia at a time when California's classic points were mobbed. That's what drew Greenough down there and kept him there. His design input went well beyond fins. There was a lot of rhetoric coming out of Australia after '66, much of it attributable to elevated exuberance and mind altering substances. But something Wayne Lynch said after the '70 World Championships is telling: that Rolf Aurness's boards were refined versions of things that Wayne and others had experimented with earlier, but in the rush to get radical and 'totally involved', had moved beyond without fully developing the potential. Was Rolf on Bings at the time?
 




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