What's with Stewart?

Discussion in 'Surfing' started by michael, Jun 22, 2018.

  1. SeniorGrom

    SeniorGrom Well-Known Member

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    USA New Jersey
    I spent some time talking to Steve Walden in and out of the water when he was visiting a few years ago. He found it hard to understand that anyone would be interested in riding flat rockered single fin logs. He felt a more high performance longboard was way more versatile, user friendly, and easy to ride.
     
  2. Bighouse

    Bighouse Active Member

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    Feb 21, 2012
    East End, Long Island

    Make sense, but easy gets boring.
     
  3. sightpoint

    sightpoint Active Member

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    2' and onshore
    Um, for real? Huh.
     
  4. Chilly Willy

    Chilly Willy Well-Known Member

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    My first two longboards were both 9'0" Stewarts. They didn't have specific model lams on them, so I guess they were just stock boards. The nice thing about them for a beginner is that they are about as light as a longboard can possibly be. A 20+ lb longboard can be cumbersome and intimidating for a lot of reasons. Light is good when you're just starting out. The bad thing about them is that they are light because the glassing schedule would best be described as "eggshell". I used to ding it just looking at it the wrong way. Dings, dents, and delam. I crunched up the rails just having it in my roof racks. But it was a responsive board that wanted to be surfed rail to rail and wasn't as intimidating as a heavier log when it's rumbling around in the whitewater with you during a wipeout.

    I rode these Stewarts in the late 90s and early 2000s. My surfing trajectory was changed entirely when I picked up a Yater Spoon and got a taste of traditional style longboarding. I never looked back, other than the time that the Spoon was in for repairs and I had to fall back on the Stewart as my backup board. It didn't strike me as a bad board, just different and required a different riding style. I could make it go fairly fast by surfing rail to rail, and I remember being not concerned about trying to pull into tubes because the board was so much lighter than the Spoon (I'd probably do more damage to the board than it would do to me).

    Here's me on 9'0" Stewart #2 when I was still pretty new at it. My first hurricane season.

    fabian_1.jpg
     
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  5. Veterano

    Veterano Well-Known Member

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    I could write a thesis on what I meant by my comment, but what's point? If you don't know what I mean, no amount of explanation would change anything.
     
  6. Ticowannabe

    Ticowannabe Well-Known Member

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    i started to get into hp longboards in the mid to late 90's when my boys were old enough to catch waves on boogies so we could surf together. My usual's, Creek and Trestles were a bit much for them. I loved a few 9' LSP Stewarts and broke a few too...they had no bevel, were very thin and loads of rocker made them rip by anyone's measure, especially in larger surf but certainly harder to paddle in the little stuff. Never really liked the hydrohull or the bevel but many people did. Logs and all the retro stuff were not really options then and i had some amazing sessions in some amazing locations on those boards with and without my kids...as well as some of the Terry Senate and Timmy Paterson thrusters of the era. Haters, well they do just that, Bill Stewart was a decent guy, was a good marketer and a good member of the community and we spent many Indian guide trips with our boys so he was at the very least a decent dad, being a good dad generally makes you a little less self important and self centered, so there's that.
     
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  7. Veterano

    Veterano Well-Known Member

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    "Logs and all the retro stuff were not really options then" - too much. that's what long boards were, are and always will be. the rocked out garbage of that era stained the genre for awhile but people wised up after awhile.
    " Haters, well they do just that, Bill Stewart was a decent guy" - everyone is entitled to their opinion which is generally (at least it should be anyway) on personal experience and interaction.
     
  8. Ticowannabe

    Ticowannabe Well-Known Member

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    "everyone is entitled to their opinion which is generally (at least it should be anyway) on personal experience"
    Those two paragraphs above and your general opinion seem disparate and certainly we should all be shamed if not in lockstep agreement.
    Not many people shaping traditional logs in the mid 90's and i was into buying local and most of them felt like dogs coming from my perspective, had there been more alternatives and decent mids around it likely would have been different for me. For me, logs of the day were not a good transition coming from my short boards.
     
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  9. Surfnfish

    Surfnfish Well-Known Member

    This forum hosts the unusually informed and hence, strongly opinionated...the best of breed jewels showcased here the icons of a commitment that transcends mere sport or recreation...

    for most out in the general mix, however, surfing is just that...sport, recreation...and a production popout, such as a Stewart, will suffice them just fine..

    and that's a good thing...imagine what a truly good custom board would cost if there was intense competition to buy one...low volume shapers would suddenly be in great demand with long waiting lists for limited sales,, charging prices that would actually enable them to afford homes, decent cars, plan for a graceful retirement, versus dying of old age next to the shaping stands with a Skil 100 frozen to their arthritic hands...

    so please, strongly encourage mass purchases of Stewart, Firewire, etc...keep those custom shapers starving so we can afford their boards!
     
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  10. Ticowannabe

    Ticowannabe Well-Known Member

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    "This forum hosts the unusually informed and hence, strongly opinionated...the best of breed jewels showcased here the icons of a commitment that transcends mere sport or recreation..."
    Seriously? I would say that is true of some of the shapers here.
    i often agree with you and love your stories but it's hard to here.
    I have had as many or more custom boards than a person ought to, and surfed in the same waves locally and for longer than Vet did and some of the same long distance wave locations the both of you have yet i don't deride people for their preferences nor do i treat a subjective topic as anything other than what it is.
    SnF you still surf the same style boards being derided in the thread and your favorite local shaper is a former ghost shaper from arguably the equally 'pop out' Rusty and most of the custom shapers scrub computer boards these days, in the old days they were ghost shapers or maybe named shapers in the stable knocking out the bosses shapes at most of the shops.
    The revered Terry Martin shaped at Stewart right? So whats your opinion on this gem "that's what long boards were, are and always will be. the rocked out garbage of that era stained the genre for awhile but people wised up after awhile."
    i realize the two of you share a similar age and perhaps experience and that's great.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2018

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