The Great Hull Discussion

Discussion in 'Surfing' started by Freddibetts, Sep 27, 2017.

  1. Human

    Human Member

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    Nov 20, 2016
    Oceanside
    In my opinionated opinion, I think good hull riding is entrancing. Look at how and when these reepa's use the bottom contours and rails - you're likely to use way less of the planshapes surface area if you're doing it right.

     
  2. Freddibetts

    Freddibetts Active Member

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    May 7, 2015
    USA New York
  3. garagefull

    garagefull Active Member

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    Feb 22, 2004
    Santa Cruz
     
  4. poidog

    poidog Active Member

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    Sep 7, 2010
    My sh*tbird's two cents. Others with far more hull experience might cringe at my over-simplification, but for me if you think of the rails as working in conjunction with the fin everything sort of follows from that. The rails basically have to work in conjunction with the fin if the tail is relatively wide and the fin is narrow-based. Too much back foot pressure over the fin would cause the board to spin out. You'd naturally need to move forward to engage more rail.

    So if you take away the back foot and stand mid-board then quick tail responses won't be possible and turns will be more drawn out. Maybe that's where the "can't ride 'em in beach break or backside" comes from, I don't know. But they can be ridden in beach break and backside IMO, just differently. Get a clean wall, nothing better.

    I can't ride them anymore, they work better shorter IMO (engage less rail) and I'm too old. Need more float. But for younger surfers or old farts with less shoulder/neck/back problems I'd say life is waaay too short to not try a hull.

    Scott Anderson among others make longer hulls from Liddle templates, Super Smoothies I think they're called, something like that. Tempted to get one.
     
    McQuad likes this.
  5. aloha73

    aloha73 Member

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    Jun 19, 2004
    I like your over-simplification Poidog. Makes sense. Speaking of Anderson boards, my Flowmaster has a lot of hull-like properties and even though it's a 10'5 glider, you have to surf it like you'd surf a hull. I have a flex fin in it and it snaps out of turns, glides and goes into overdrive just like my 7'7 Liddle. Turns best from the middle and paddles like a dream. It has the hard tail and hull belly underneath. One of my favorites in the quiver.
     
  6. Human

    Human Member

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    65
    Nov 20, 2016
    Oceanside
    A77AC467-422F-434A-9AA8-DC550A2C180E.jpeg B78199F6-FC1A-419F-8575-0E06B1F00A18.jpeg BEBA73D1-2FCD-41F3-BAB0-428B98571D61.jpeg


    Some new ones from the weekend



    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017
  7. Veterano

    Veterano Active Member

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    Aug 29, 2013
  8. garagefull

    garagefull Active Member

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    Feb 22, 2004
    Santa Cruz
    Aloha73, how big a fin are you using? I just acquired a 10'2 Flowmaster. I've only been able to ride it a couple times in small semi-crappy beachbreak. I tried an 8.75" Andreini A-Flex and the board felt stiff and hard to turn. Then I tried an 8.25" Takayama pivot fin, hoping to loosen it up some. That helped a bit. I can drive front foot turns on my 7'4 Liddle GLPB but that technique isn't working with the Flowmaster. Thanks.
     
  9. aloha73

    aloha73 Member

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    Jun 19, 2004
    Not 100% sure what fin it is but if I were to garner a guess it would be a Norm Flex by TA. It's 9" and I've had it forever. Its flex is extreme and will move about 2 inches when you flex it. If anyone else knows what it may be throw it out here. There are no markings on it and it's clear but doesn't show any volant cloth.

    IMG_1431.jpg
     
  10. garagefull

    garagefull Active Member

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    Feb 22, 2004
    Santa Cruz
    Thanks for the info, you've got more fin than I have tried yet. I think I need to put in more time and on better waves to get the board dialed in. I think a flex fin would go well in better surf. As you said, the Flowmaster is really a long hull.
     

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