Spraypainting a Surfboard

Discussion in 'Surfing' started by joepoko, Apr 24, 2018.

  1. SeniorGrom

    SeniorGrom Well-Known Member

    2,212
    749
    Mar 20, 2012
    USA New Jersey
    Most of the fins I make are finished with PE gloss resin fine sanded & polished. These two flexy ones were just sanded. Because that hid the logo I masked off a small area and dusted with Rust-Oleum 2X ultra cover gloss clear (rattle can). Then wet sanded with 800 & 1000. Made a ‘window’ to be able to see into the logo. Been using the 2X for some other applications with success too.

    9099E4B1-93A1-4167-A028-2470F4F8E348.jpeg
     
    Surfnfish likes this.
  2. Gill

    Gill Active Member

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    70
    Mar 21, 2018
    Spring Lake Heights, NJ
    I ran into a similar situation- I had an old 60's popout - Malibu Surfboards. The bottom of the board looked like garbage, but the top was ok and with wax is unnoticeable. I really actually enjoy riding this board on crowded summer days, and just wanted to seal up the bottom, since it was almost worn out and had a lot of small cracks from the fiberglass mat that they used in pop outs... So I thought about spray paint etc but didn't want to take a chance on having it peel...

    So I basically painted the board the way you would a car... figuring it would hold up the longest. If you have a compressor or can use one with good air flow, it's fairly inexpensive... but may take some practice and time if you have never used a spray gun... a longer time with all the setup time and coats then using rattle cans

    I did lightly sand the board to prep it, I forget the grit- but probably around 200 to 400

    I used oil based paint, pictured below, available at HD. You can also get more expensive stuff at a car parts store. You'll have to thin the paint a good amount (w/ acetone) to spray it... I used a cheap harbor freight spray gun ($10) so I didn't ruin my good one, but make sure to buy exact item # 67181. Also a respirator is a must. Also, good ventilation is a must, like outside.

    i painted it outside, with no wind. A slight breeze started for me half way through, so there are some minor imperfections- but can be sanded/buffed out. I sprayed many coats of paint. I think at least 4

    The oil based paint I used takes FOREVER to fully cure. It dries quick, but full cure took maybe 2-3 months...like you could feel the paint was still soft with your finger nail...

    BUT now the end result is a nice paint job, like glass... and it's solid as well




    IMG_4044.JPG
    Cutlap on top (simple masking tap and plastic):
    IMG_4043.JPG
    Prior to paint:
    IMG_4003.JPG IMG_5639.PNG IMG_5640.JPG IMG_5641.PNG
     
  3. deemce

    deemce Active Member

    806
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    May 18, 2010
    USA Pennsylvania

    Nice job.
     
    Tenfooter likes this.
  4. joepoko

    joepoko New Member

    17
    11
    Feb 6, 2018
    Queens, NY
    alright following up on this since i'm restoring an old pig for my father.

    i've done two layers of spraypaint + plus clear coat over the whole board and was going to hot coat over the new paintjob. is this a good idea? or is some bizarre chemical reaction going to occur where it ruins everything? thanks dudes
     
  5. SeniorGrom

    SeniorGrom Well-Known Member

    2,212
    749
    Mar 20, 2012
    USA New Jersey
    Not sure why you would want to put PE resin over paint. The term ‘hotcoat’ or fill coat normally applies to the resin step after the lamination. A hotcoat fills the weave and gives you a sandable surface. Sounds like you want to do a ‘gloss’ coat of resin. When in doubt, always do a test panel.
     
  6. joepoko

    joepoko New Member

    17
    11
    Feb 6, 2018
    Queens, NY
    yeah, that! so that's different than just using like a solarez UV resin right? sorry if i sound like an idiot, first time around doing this...
     
  7. JBorbone

    JBorbone Active Member

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    Oct 18, 2017
    Belmar, NJ
    Hi @joepoko -

    don't gloss it.

    epoxy resin has a phobic reaction to anything that comes out of a can due to the aerosol chemicals, it doesn't matter if it's water based or not. even if you rough it up with 80 grit paper, it still wont work because the mechanical bond isn't strong enough to counteract the lack of chemical bond.

    some folks have claimed to do this successfully with Poly resin, but everything i've seen first hand has fisheyed (resin separated from the spray) like crazy all over the gloss.

    i know i'm not the only board builder on the forum so someone else can feel free to second this, but given plenty of first hand experience, i can advise that you should exclusively stick to a single type of chemical to keep things bonding properly. If you started with spray, stick to only spray. if you started with resin, stick to that kind of resin. Don't mix and match.

    Unless you were doing all this directly on the foam, that would be a different story. But you're not.
     
  8. SeniorGrom

    SeniorGrom Well-Known Member

    2,212
    749
    Mar 20, 2012
    USA New Jersey
    No problem. Solarez UV most likely comes in two versions. Laminating resin (surface remains tacky), and Sanding resin (contains wax agent mixed in). Sanding resin can be used as a hotcoat or then a final gloss coat. One advantage using UV for this final step is you can keep it away from UV rays as long as needed until it flows out flat and brush strokes are gone. Then expose to light. The wax additive rises to the surface and creates an air barrier and a hard sandable surface. True ‘gloss’ resin cures harder and flows better for a super hard shell and can be sanded and polished to a very high gloss. Many don’t use this resin. Easy enough to do a test panel. Lam several layers of cloth, hotcoat, lightly sand, paint, let dry, lightly sand, brush on your UV gloss/sanding resin, cure in UV. After all done bend an flex & see how it all holds up. Any other more experienced here please add your comments.....
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2018
  9. Gill

    Gill Active Member

    148
    70
    Mar 21, 2018
    Spring Lake Heights, NJ
    I would leave it alone like Jborne said, it will probably create more problems. At this point , if you want to do anything else, I would ad coats of clear... did you use rattle cans?

    Anyways after the clear, if you want to smooth it out and gloss it up, use some rubbing compound, 3m makes some found at advanced auto
     

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