How cold is too cold for my Patagonia R3 wetsuit?

Discussion in 'Surfing' started by newlyn, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. newlyn

    newlyn Active Member

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    Jul 20, 2013
    USA Pennsylvania
    I'd like to surf this Sunday in NJ, but looks like the water temp (35?) and air temp (high of 27), may be colder than my R3 can handle. I am fairly resistant to cold, but I think the R3 is rated only for mid-40's (which is about as low as I have used it). I don't want to drive two hours only to find out I am woefully under-covered. So, would I be crazy to try an R3 in NJ on Sunday?
     
  2. Fishy

    Fishy Active Member

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    Aug 22, 2014
    Hard core. How about a heated vest under it? Can you pick one up?
     
  3. newlyn

    newlyn Active Member

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    Jul 20, 2013
    USA Pennsylvania
    Interesting thought, but I'd probably just get a heavier wetsuit first. I don't really surf enough in the dead of winter to justify it though.
     
  4. jdogger

    jdogger Active Member

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    Apr 4, 2006
    USA California
     
  5. jdogger

    jdogger Active Member

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    Apr 4, 2006
    USA California
    Go skiing or sledding, or something that involves cold and snow.
     
  6. CT Charlie

    CT Charlie Member

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    Jul 22, 2017
    SNJ
    I can tell you that if the wind in howling, as predicted, it maybe sorted conditions. Which, could be a great day to come down and test your patagucci R3 suit (you may be okay for an or so). Keep in mind, you should use some precautions and surf with others in the lineup while you confirm the soundness of your equipment, i.e. when you start freezing your nuts and berries off. By the way, I love my R4 patagucci suit. See you in the line up.
     
  7. kpd73

    kpd73 Well-Known Member

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    May 8, 2013
    USA Rhode Island
    CT Charlie likes this.
  8. CT Charlie

    CT Charlie Member

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    Jul 22, 2017
    SNJ
    You're in business, stop in CC Philly, pick up the suit, rock on! That's why you gotta love JBers! Kpd, way to go.
     
  9. Wade In The Waves

    Wade In The Waves Well-Known Member

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    Mar 23, 2012
    USA North Carolina
    Call the Patagonia Outlets. I bought a past season non hooded R4 for around $130 brand new during one of their sales. I then bought a their heater vest from the outlet as well that is hooded. If you are during those temps in an R3, you are hard core. The heater vest may be all you need as it is thicker than some the others like the Xcel one that I have. It isn't a suit that I will probably wear much, but it isn't too much to pay to have one around just in case.
     
  10. Chilly Willy

    Chilly Willy Well-Known Member

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    Feb 15, 2004
    USA New Jersey
    What's the thickness on that suit... 4/3? I would call that undergunned for sure. Standard winter water temps around here mostly fluctuate between 38-41 degrees with a few colder spells. In my opinion, every degree below that range makes a difference, and it feels exponentially more unpleasant when you factor in colder air temps and stronger wind. If you want to surf at those temperatures, I would wholeheartedly recommend taking the plunge (pardon the pun) with the proper gear. For me, a 5/4 hooded chest zip (with that fleece-like lining) with 7mm boots and 5mm lobster claw gloves gets me through the entire season. I have never needed to wear a 6/5 suit, so I'd say that the 5/4 is enough for any given day in NJ, save for a handful of the very coldest snaps.

    For what it's worth, you will probably also be safer with the proper suit. When I am wearing an inadequate suit, I find that I will try to resist going underwater when I wipe out -- I have been hit by my board several times because I'm trying to resist instead of just going with the flow.

    Winter waves can be quite the temptress. We've all seen people come out of the woodwork even in the spring that try to brave the cold water in inadequate suits just because the waves look great or the air is warmer. They last 5-10 minutes, tops. Knowing the distance you're coming, I would definitely tell you to save yourself the mileage and hassle unless you've got the gear to make it worth your time.
     

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