General question about gliders

Discussion in 'Surfing' started by WhiteRussian, Apr 14, 2019.

  1. WhiteRussian

    WhiteRussian Active Member

    434
    83
    Oct 16, 2007
    Boston Harbor
    Hey there,

    I ran across the board I like and seller describes it as "It's an old school glider for the retro enthusiast or an older surfer in generally smaller conditions." I think I'm more confused than I was before. What are gliders for? To glide right? I get this part. I remember someone called them " Point and shoot", does it mean you really cannot turn it? Are they easy to paddle? Is it an everyday board or is it something special what taken out just a few days a year? I'm in Boston and don't surf OH.

    p.s. Perhaps this question and recent shopping frenzy caused by my lackluster experience the last couple of times when I felt foreign on my board. I probably just have to get out more often and practice but aren't we always looking for a magic board that will do everything for you?
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2019
    michael likes this.
  2. DanSan

    DanSan Well-Known Member

    941
    327
    Jun 7, 2012
    USA California
    I dunno.. maybe the longer ones 12'....
    Turn harder..especially with too big a fin...
    Mine is like butter..smooth..creamy..
    Got it fromthe board source...jon
    It was the george 10.6 x 24 x 3 3/8...
    I use either a TA's 8" 4A..or 8.5" skip
    The flater rocker ...and outline really
    Highlight ..trim..glider..
    But drop knee turns..
    Regular turns..ok
    Just becareful of steeper drops
    With less nose rocker...
    I guess is my take away..
    But you will catch so much earlier...
    On the wave..it usually is no problem...
    Mine is aweome....so long are the rides..
    It is deceptive..
     
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  3. SeniorGrom

    SeniorGrom Well-Known Member

    2,522
    1,102
    Mar 20, 2012
    USA New Jersey
    Seems to me gliders are best for long rolling swells with a slopey face. Not so much for a beach break where the wave jacks up quickly and the lip throws out. I have seen them ridden locally with those pitchy lips BUT you have to be capable of getting in early and know how to turn them when the bottom drains out and a wall builds. Not for everyone or every condition. I don’t want one for our beach break locally even if it would get me into a wave outside of others in the lineup.
     
    WhiteRussian likes this.
  4. Veterano

    Veterano Well-Known Member

    1,365
    896
    Aug 29, 2013
    first things first, learn to surf.
     
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  5. Mbaltazar

    Mbaltazar New Member

    16
    8
    Mar 17, 2019
    Portugal
    I tried a 10'2" glider a few times, on a local point break, in no bigger than shoulder high surf.

    It was pretty fun, but in no way it's a "go to" board. The board was very stable, very easy to catch waves, take off and turn. The pin tail really helps the maneuverability, but it's as the "name" states a glider... You just glide on an open face, toes on the nose and back, an occasional cut back and not much more. A ton of fun, but a very specific kind of board.
     
    WhiteRussian likes this.
  6. glidewaves

    glidewaves Member

    206
    21
    Jul 9, 2007
    USA New Jersey,Maryland
    Here are my opinions on your questions:
    -"Point and shoot, does it mean you really cannot turn it?" I have an 11' 2" pintail, it's turnable for sure, but the preferred mode is "Point and shoot"

    -"Are they easy to paddle?"-Yes, the early paddle-in is really gratifying, but beware you need powerful deep strokes to get that momentum going. But momentum is what these birds are all about and what I find addictive about mine. Your shoulders will remind you of this by bedtime.

    -"Everyday board or something special?"- I've surfed mine from NJ to ME and use it in the following conditions:
    -Tiny conditions when you just need to get out.
    -Mushy or high-tide conditions when you don't have the luxury to time your sessions based on weather, winds or tides.
    -Jetty or rivermouth setups (ME state parks) where swells jack up over rocks and mush out over channels. Your momentum will carry you over these for incredibly long rides on days/tides which might otherwise be no-go's.
    -Clean lined up days when you're simply in the mood just to feel that magic momentum and enjoy super long rides.
     
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  7. Lackosense

    Lackosense Well-Known Member

    668
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    Apr 25, 2017
    Long Beach, NY
    Anndddddd i want a glider again...
     
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  8. JBorbone

    JBorbone Well-Known Member

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    331
    Oct 18, 2017
    Belmar, NJ
    I'm actually in the preliminary stages of organizing a proper "trim" contest similar to what they have in Noosa. It'll be on the East Coast and it'll highlight the capabilities of a proper glider through objective judging based on length of ride and average speed.

    Given that you live in Boston you'll probably be within a reasonable proximity to attend. Seeing the boards surfed by a bunch of very capable surfers might help clarify exactly what they're designed for.
     
  9. cuda

    cuda Well-Known Member

    1,351
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    Aug 23, 2007
    slide the glide clinic
     
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  10. Dawnpatrol

    Dawnpatrol Well-Known Member

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    May 7, 2006
    PNW
    And even then, depending on the Glider not exactly user friendly for most folks coming off shortboards, hybrids or a modern longboard. Case in point: I have a 11' Hunt. All volan, a pintail with a 11" fin. Hard pinched rails on the nose and knife like on the tail. 50/50 in the middle. Weight; 38 pounds! If you haven't deduced by now, this board is challenging and I only ride it at select spots. No more at San'O nor Doho. Too many people and this board is a point and shoot, even on the tail you are going to be hard press to turn it. The plus side: set your angle on a wave, get the weight and momentum going by paddling early for the incomer and the board treats you to a buttery glide and connects through sections. I have ridden Christensen, Andriene and Mabile gliders. All a lot less demanding than my Hunt and you can turn 'em with less effort but still, the name of the game when riding a Glider is that you have to be slow, steady and planned out on your feet and moves your going to make. No pinball surfing on these crafts!

    BTW, my next Glider (yes, I'm hooked) will be to find a Mabile or just throw down the $$$$$$ for a custom Andrienne EPS rehab Glider. Loved your board Tico!
     
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