2nd attempt at making wood keels

Discussion in 'Surfing' started by Jmazz, Oct 15, 2018.

  1. Jmazz

    Jmazz Member

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    Jul 11, 2018
    Ny
    My 2nd attempt at fins,
    Single side foil, getting better. But still not perfect
     

    Attached Files:

  2. dingpatch

    dingpatch Well-Known Member

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    Apr 2, 2014
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    It's a start, , , , , and looking pretty good! It took me a good while before I figured out how to eliminate my "short comings". The wood working is one thing, the glassing is a whole other world, , , , ,. I'm not a pro but I do OK, after about 500 fins. Now, it seems sort of funny when somebody asks me about a "technical" aspect they are having trouble with, and that I figured out, overcame, and now find trivial.
     
  3. Jmazz

    Jmazz Member

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    Jul 11, 2018
    Ny
    I actually find this therapeutic , I'd like to get good at it, would be great to have my fins on someone's board one day
     
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  4. Chilly Willy

    Chilly Willy Well-Known Member

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    Not bad! With wood keels (or other wood fins), do you usually use one layer of cloth to glass it, or do you have to lay up a ton of layers? I guess it depends on how the wood is shaped and how you want to attach it? Kind of answering my own question, but still curious.
     
  5. Jmazz

    Jmazz Member

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    Jul 11, 2018
    Ny
    I've seen vids where 2 to 3 layers of cloth is laid
     
  6. dingpatch

    dingpatch Well-Known Member

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    My biggest problem with "keels" (and I've only made a couple because of it) is the effects of the resin on the thin wood. My very best wooden creations were ruined by the poly resin soaking into and then warping the wood after I've templated and foiled. A "glass on" would be different but, trying to foil and then glass a fin for Futures is a Pain In The A! Too thin. I have had moderate success with laminating one side of the wood, prior to templating and foiling (!!!), with a couple layers of 4 or 6 ounce cloth using epoxy. This gives the wood much more rigidity to work with. I find that the chemistry of the epoxy does not interact with the wood so much as poly does.
     
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  7. cuda

    cuda Well-Known Member

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    Try spraying the wood with a couple of coats of matte Polyurethane (cheater coat) before glassing.
     
  8. SeniorGrom

    SeniorGrom Well-Known Member

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    Mar 20, 2012
    USA New Jersey
    Very nicely done! I’m no woodworker and have only done a few wood keels. Boy can you remove material fast when foiling compared to solid glass. The only thing I might suggest from looking at the pic is, rough cut the template panel then.......make sure the edge is SQUARE and Fine Tune the outline. Get those curves as perfect and pleasing to the eye as possibe. Just like when shaping foam, the outline, square edge, and flowing blended curves are key before foiling. Keep up the good work. Stoked for you.
     
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  9. jdogger

    jdogger Active Member

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    Apr 4, 2006
    USA California
    You're too modest. You ARE a pro.
     
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  10. dingpatch

    dingpatch Well-Known Member

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    Yes, a "sealer" coat would be fine. But, and so, here's what I've found to be "MY" best process for keels, , , , ,

    Run wood through the planer to obtain the appropriate thickness.
    Cut wood down to the "near net" template shape/size. Allow for about an inch or-so of extra wood on the bottom portion.
    Lay-up a couple layers of cloth and place wooden pieces down on them with some weight but, not too much weight (you don't want to squeeze out too much resin).
    When fully cured, place the two pieces together (glass to glass) and attach them securely together at the bottom "extra" portion (glue or screws). This is so that both keels can be templated and then foiled together. It is so much easier being able to have them "together" like this while being foiled. Trying to "match" the foils on two separate pieces can become maddening.
    After completing the foiling, separate the pieces and cut off the bottom excess so that the resulting pieces are the size/height of what will be seen sticking out of the box.
    Now, I had simple "tools" made out of sheetmetal to use to establish the desired "cant" (usually about 6 degrees). This is not the same as camber (which is established by the position of the boxes). I use a piece of good Lexan sized just "over" sized, but thin enough to fit the final glassed dimensions for proper fit into the box, and with one edge angled/beveled to match the "cant" where it meets the wood. The Lexan portion is what will be the resulting part of the keel that fits into the Futures box. The main area of the sheetmetal is sized for laying up a couple layers of cloth, and the "cant" portion is bent up to the appropriate angle for the desired cant. I put mold release on the sheetmetal and then I lay down the cloth and resin, place the keel down on it (previously glassed side down) and place the Lexan piece onto the glass where the sheetmetal is angled up. Let this fully cure and then "pop" it off.
    Trim the glass down, and cut/edge the lexan base part down to a "near net" size/shape, and then apply the rest of the glass to the previously un-glassed wood and and bottom lexan base part.
    Let it all cure, trim it and clean it up, fit the base to the box, polish it up, and you "should" be good-to-go.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2018
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